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Phyl

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Re: Pets
« on: January 07, 2015, 04:57:30 PM »

Alley Cat Allies.org

Alley Cat Allies (@alleycatallies) tweeted at 2:00 PM on Wed, Jan 07, 2015:
What is a feral cat? https://t.co/vgYnnFpxhZ
(https://twitter.com/alleycatallies/status/552917656559312896?s=03)

This is very informative and helps dispel the misconceptions of cats. Please view. It's short and to the point...
One of the organizations I support and believe in.
Thank you!
#IStandWithUkraine


“God just sat down and smiled after he made cats.”~Richard Dawkins

A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.
– Lewis Gannett

Phyl

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Re: Pets
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2015, 05:00:38 PM »



Introducing, Mike and Maggie, two brown Tabbies.  Mike was adopted from Nashville Humane Association's no kill shelter in the fall of 2002, four months after we had lost our previous kitty of Siamese and bobcat mix. (yes, bobcat!)
Mike was one of a litter originally 8 kittens. That afternoon, I had browsed up and down the aisles of cages in their cat wing for an hour looking for that 'special' cat. About to give up, I took one last stroll and stopped dead in front of a cage of 6 remaining mewing kittens all crowed and scrunched in the front . All but one!  A solitary little kitten sitting silently in the very back...staring at me with those gentle amber eyes. Mine met his.  I asked the attendant about the history of this litter. She told me that a family had left them two weeks ago because they moving due to job relocation and could only take the Momcat; all kittens were weaned, healthy, spayed and neutered. And, the kitten that caught me eye was a male; the family were Christian as revealed by the names the children had given the kittens, all after dynamic Biblical people. Except one.  That solitary kitten in the back was named after the Archangel Michael, the Warrior angel. A name that would later serve him well.
He was given to me to take to the isolation room so we could 'get acquainted'. He immediately, crawled up my  and nestled against my cheek and purred himself to sleep!  Two weeks later after paperwork processed, we took Mike home. He grew to be a loveable, rascal of a sweetheart who loved to play chase. A wonderful 11 years that was cut short by cancer of the trachea. The last two years were spent in and out  of our vets with tests then a referral to Blue pear Veterinary Partners in Cool Springs, TN and Drs. Holste and Johnson more tests, accurate diagnosis of  pneumonia and a lobectomy, recovery. And no permanent  improvement more tests and heartbreaking news, cancer. It was a nodule at the carina (where trachea branches off into the bronchial tubes). Our vet at Blue Pearl consulted with her old prof at her old alma mater Illinois State University, College of Veterinary Medicine at Urbana and Dr. McKernahn for an ablation. That year we spent Mother's Day waiting in the hotel and then the waiting room during Mikes' procedure. It went perfectly and Mike recovered in two weeks and was his old self once more. But, as doctors told us the cancer would come back and with a 'vengence'. So it did and the last year was spent in chemotheraphy. But, after 8 mos. and cancer only progressing; his life had been spent with things being done to him. And, when I saw that 'look' in his eyes... We decided to just  let the disease run it's course and watch for the moment...
when a pet parent makes the most difficult decision there is to make, euthanization. They say, the greatest love is that of letting go; releasing that loved one to do what needs to be done for their sake. May 25 th of 2013. He is forever in my heart and thoughts... those we truly love never leave us.
         Maggie, is named after my late mother's dearest friend, Margaret. She came to us and Mike from our vet's  back in 2004. She was one of a litter of original 6  un-weaned kittens abandoned on the office doorstep at just 3 mos. The vet took them in, bottle fed them inoculated them and kept them in a cage just off the reception area. I met Maggie when I stopped in to pay Mike's bill; heard the mewing and got nosey. And, there, like deja vu, was a cage of 5 kittens crammed up front with one little lonely girl in the back. Silent and beguiling me with her emerald green eyes that said, " Take me...home, with you."  I asked for her and we cuddled on the sofa. Like Mike, she crawled up to my shoulder, nuzzled my cheek.  I called my husband, a corporate pilot who  had just landed in Boston. I told him about Maggie and he said ' Just this once."  After three months to gain more weight and strength and spaying, Maggie the Cat came home with me. After a rocky start, both she and Mike became pals .Many a night between 2 and 3:30 am they could be heard playing soccer with a tinkle ball.
           Maggie is settling into her inherited  position of Queen of the house and mistress of all she surveys while gazing out the windows on either floor. She has filled the position left vacant by Mike, most well indeed...this little  sweet with an attitude cat who can hold a conversation better than any human. My little 'girl' who never leaves my side.
           Inclosing, I've been a pet parent to cats for over 30 yrs. and this species, house kitty or lion, tiger or panther, never, never ceases to amaze me!
                 






« Last Edit: March 12, 2022, 04:16:13 AM by Phyl »
#IStandWithUkraine


“God just sat down and smiled after he made cats.”~Richard Dawkins

A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.
– Lewis Gannett

ra

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Re: Pets
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2015, 07:18:02 PM »

Phyliz... You talk about euthanization... I had that hard chore just yesterday.  Had to say goodbye to my Joy after spending almost 18 years with her.  What a heartbreaking thing to do, but she isn't suffering anymore...  Your Mike and Maggie are beautiful!
Wisdom doesn't necessarily come with age.
Sometimes, age just shows up by itself.

NW SC USA

Phyl

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Re: Pets
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2015, 11:38:34 PM »

Hi ra!
This is such a difficult task. But, as they say, 'Greatest love is knowing when to let go.'
I am so very sorry for your loss.

#IStandWithUkraine


“God just sat down and smiled after he made cats.”~Richard Dawkins

A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.
– Lewis Gannett

ra

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Re: Pets
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2015, 08:51:46 PM »

Thanks, Phyl.
Wisdom doesn't necessarily come with age.
Sometimes, age just shows up by itself.

NW SC USA

Phyl

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Re: Pets
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2015, 04:59:54 PM »

I found this on today's Animal Rescue Site of the Greater Good Networks
3 Cheers for Disney Land in Buena  Vista, CA and the Feral Cats!! **
**see bold italicized print
After dark, the dirty work at Disneyland begins


A crew of 600 custodians, painters, gardeners and decorators works 365 nights a year to ensure that the 85-acre park meets Walt Disney?s squeaky-clean ideals.

May 02, 2010|By Hugo Mart?n, Los Angeles Times


Visitors on Main Street U.S.A. await Disneyland?s opening after its sprucing up by the night crew, upholding founder Walt Disney?s vision of an immaculate land, free of the litter and grime of the outside world.

When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins.

At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails.

Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.

Welcome to the dark side of Disneyland.

Gone are Mickey and his friends. In their place are about 600 custodians, painters, gardeners and decorators, working to ensure that the 85-acre park meets the squeaky-clean ideals that Walt Disney himself extolled even before he launched the park 55 years ago.

During a recent overnight shift, Disneyland provided a rare glimpse into the work that goes into maintaining the world's second-most-popular theme park. Though park officials wouldn't divulge how much money is spent on Disneyland's overall upkeep, they said most is spent on the night shift.

And although most guests will never witness the after-hours work, theme park experts credit the park's continued success to its cleanliness and tidy conditions.

"Disney and many other parks recognize that keeping it clean and refreshed, with all of those little details that you don't notice until they are missing, are important to the park's success," said Gene Jeffers, executive director of the Themed Entertainment Assn., a nonprofit organization of designers and builders of theme parks and attractions.

It's one of the many reasons attendance at Disneyland jumped 8% last year despite the economic downturn, while the crowd numbers dropped at Southern California competitors like Universal Studios Hollywood, Six Flags Magic Mountain and Knott's Berry Farm, according to a recent estimate.

To keep the park in good order, it takes a crew that works 365 nights a year, toiling under portable floodlights. "It's a city that never sleeps," said David Caranci, the manager of resort enhancement and decorating. "There is something always happening."

And for nearly every nighttime task, there is a specific worker.

Three workers are responsible solely for repairing and replacing the 800 umbrellas, 25,000 chairs and about 7,000 tables in the restaurants and snack bars in Disneyland and neighboring California Adventure Park.

Four certified divers collect submerged trash and make repairs on water attractions like Finding Nemo and the Jungle Cruise.

The work can often be tedious and occasionally bizarre. At the Enchanted Tiki Room, a 17-minute musical show features 225 robotic birds, plants and singing tikis. Patrick Pendleton, the show's primary mechanic, has seen it more times than he can count.

To make sure the characters work properly, he plays the show repeatedly, watching each closely. "It's hard to catch everything in one show," he said.

Sometimes, the jobs require ingenuity, even for some of the more distasteful chores. For example, the Indiana Jones Adventure ride relies on nearly 1,000 black lights that shine on painted mesh screens to create floating ghost images.

But the effect is marred when guests sometimes spit at the ghosts, and the saliva ends up on the screens where it glows under black lights. Because typical cleaning products bleach the screens, David Graefen, the ride's service manager, said his crew created a special saliva-cleaning solution.

Park workers have also found a resourceful way to remove other unwanted guests ? rodents.

Years ago ? no one seems to know when ? feral cats began to sneak into the park, living among the park's trees and shrubs during the day. At night, they venture out, and an estimated 200 cats now prowl through Disneyland and neighboring California Adventure Park.

But instead of evicting the cats, Disneyland's animal wranglers work to control the feline population by spaying and neutering the adult cats and finding homes for all kittens born in the resort. The cats eat at five permanent feeding stations installed throughout the two parks.

"We are not trying to get rid of them," said Gina Mayberry, manager of Disneyland's Circle D ranch, where the park's animals are housed. "They keep the rodent population down."

Other nighttime visitors are not so welcome. Before maintenance crews take over, security workers sweep through the park to find guests hoping to spend the night. (Don't even try hiding on Tom Sawyer's Island ? park security knows all the hiding places.)

"If someone tried to hide, they would not stay hidden for long," said Disneyland spokeswoman Suzi Brown.

The primary goal of the after-hours crew is to pursue Disney's vision of an immaculate land, free of the litter and grime of the outside world.


I found this on today's Animal Rescue Site of the Greater Good Networks
3 Cheers for Disney Land in Buena  Vista, CA and the Feral Cats!! **
**see bold italicized print
After dark, the dirty work at Disneyland begins


A crew of 600 custodians, painters, gardeners and decorators works 365 nights a year to ensure that the 85-acre park meets Walt Disney?s squeaky-clean ideals.

May 02, 2010|By Hugo Mart?n, Los Angeles Times


Visitors on Main Street U.S.A. await Disneyland?s opening after its sprucing up by the night crew, upholding founder Walt Disney?s vision of an immaculate land, free of the litter and grime of the outside world.

When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins.

At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails.

Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.

Welcome to the dark side of Disneyland.

Gone are Mickey and his friends. In their place are about 600 custodians, painters, gardeners and decorators, working to ensure that the 85-acre park meets the squeaky-clean ideals that Walt Disney himself extolled even before he launched the park 55 years ago.

During a recent overnight shift, Disneyland provided a rare glimpse into the work that goes into maintaining the world's second-most-popular theme park. Though park officials wouldn't divulge how much money is spent on Disneyland's overall upkeep, they said most is spent on the night shift.

And although most guests will never witness the after-hours work, theme park experts credit the park's continued success to its cleanliness and tidy conditions.

"Disney and many other parks recognize that keeping it clean and refreshed, with all of those little details that you don't notice until they are missing, are important to the park's success," said Gene Jeffers, executive director of the Themed Entertainment Assn., a nonprofit organization of designers and builders of theme parks and attractions.

It's one of the many reasons attendance at Disneyland jumped 8% last year despite the economic downturn, while the crowd numbers dropped at Southern California competitors like Universal Studios Hollywood, Six Flags Magic Mountain and Knott's Berry Farm, according to a recent estimate.

To keep the park in good order, it takes a crew that works 365 nights a year, toiling under portable floodlights. "It's a city that never sleeps," said David Caranci, the manager of resort enhancement and decorating. "There is something always happening."

And for nearly every nighttime task, there is a specific worker.

Three workers are responsible solely for repairing and replacing the 800 umbrellas, 25,000 chairs and about 7,000 tables in the restaurants and snack bars in Disneyland and neighboring California Adventure Park.

Four certified divers collect submerged trash and make repairs on water attractions like Finding Nemo and the Jungle Cruise.

The work can often be tedious and occasionally bizarre. At the Enchanted Tiki Room, a 17-minute musical show features 225 robotic birds, plants and singing tikis. Patrick Pendleton, the show's primary mechanic, has seen it more times than he can count.

To make sure the characters work properly, he plays the show repeatedly, watching each closely. "It's hard to catch everything in one show," he said.

Sometimes, the jobs require ingenuity, even for some of the more distasteful chores. For example, the Indiana Jones Adventure ride relies on nearly 1,000 black lights that shine on painted mesh screens to create floating ghost images.

But the effect is marred when guests sometimes spit at the ghosts, and the saliva ends up on the screens where it glows under black lights. Because typical cleaning products bleach the screens, David Graefen, the ride's service manager, said his crew created a special saliva-cleaning solution.

Park workers have also found a resourceful way to remove other unwanted guests ? rodents.

Years ago ? no one seems to know when ? feral cats began to sneak into the park, living among the park's trees and shrubs during the day. At night, they venture out, and an estimated 200 cats now prowl through Disneyland and neighboring California Adventure Park.

But instead of evicting the cats, Disneyland's animal wranglers work to control the feline population by spaying and neutering the adult cats and finding homes for all kittens born in the resort. The cats eat at five permanent feeding stations installed throughout the two parks.

"We are not trying to get rid of them," said Gina Mayberry, manager of Disneyland's Circle D ranch, where the park's animals are housed. "They keep the rodent population down."

Other nighttime visitors are not so welcome. Before maintenance crews take over, security workers sweep through the park to find guests hoping to spend the night. (Don't even try hiding on Tom Sawyer's Island ? park security knows all the hiding places.)

"If someone tried to hide, they would not stay hidden for long," said Disneyland spokeswoman Suzi Brown.

The primary goal of the after-hours crew is to pursue Disney's vision of an immaculate land, free of the litter and grime of the outside world.

I found this on today's Animal Rescue Site of the Greater Good Networks
3 Cheers for Disney Land in Buena  Vista, CA and the Feral Cats!! **
**see bold italicized print
After dark, the dirty work at Disneyland begins


A crew of 600 custodians, painters, gardeners and decorators works 365 nights a year to ensure that the 85-acre park meets Walt Disney?s squeaky-clean ideals.

May 02, 2010|By Hugo Mart?n, Los Angeles Times


Visitors on Main Street U.S.A. await Disneyland?s opening after its sprucing up by the night crew, upholding founder Walt Disney?s vision of an immaculate land, free of the litter and grime of the outside world.

When the last Jungle Cruise boat docks for the night and lights fade to black on Sleeping Beauty's Castle, the real work begins.

At lush Pixie Hollow, gardeners don miner's headlamps as they begin uprooting stubborn weeds. On Main Street, custodians scrape chewing gum off the sidewalk. And over at Mickey's Toontown, painters sand and recoat chipped handrails.

Few see it happen, except perhaps for the dozens of feral cats that emerge from their hiding places to prowl the park after hours, stalking rodents.

Welcome to the dark side of Disneyland.

Gone are Mickey and his friends. In their place are about 600 custodians, painters, gardeners and decorators, working to ensure that the 85-acre park meets the squeaky-clean ideals that Walt Disney himself extolled even before he launched the park 55 years ago.

During a recent overnight shift, Disneyland provided a rare glimpse into the work that goes into maintaining the world's second-most-popular theme park. Though park officials wouldn't divulge how much money is spent on Disneyland's overall upkeep, they said most is spent on the night shift.

And although most guests will never witness the after-hours work, theme park experts credit the park's continued success to its cleanliness and tidy conditions.

"Disney and many other parks recognize that keeping it clean and refreshed, with all of those little details that you don't notice until they are missing, are important to the park's success," said Gene Jeffers, executive director of the Themed Entertainment Assn., a nonprofit organization of designers and builders of theme parks and attractions.

It's one of the many reasons attendance at Disneyland jumped 8% last year despite the economic downturn, while the crowd numbers dropped at Southern California competitors like Universal Studios Hollywood, Six Flags Magic Mountain and Knott's Berry Farm, according to a recent estimate.

To keep the park in good order, it takes a crew that works 365 nights a year, toiling under portable floodlights. "It's a city that never sleeps," said David Caranci, the manager of resort enhancement and decorating. "There is something always happening."

And for nearly every nighttime task, there is a specific worker.

Three workers are responsible solely for repairing and replacing the 800 umbrellas, 25,000 chairs and about 7,000 tables in the restaurants and snack bars in Disneyland and neighboring California Adventure Park.

Four certified divers collect submerged trash and make repairs on water attractions like Finding Nemo and the Jungle Cruise.

The work can often be tedious and occasionally bizarre. At the Enchanted Tiki Room, a 17-minute musical show features 225 robotic birds, plants and singing tikis. Patrick Pendleton, the show's primary mechanic, has seen it more times than he can count.

To make sure the characters work properly, he plays the show repeatedly, watching each closely. "It's hard to catch everything in one show," he said.

Sometimes, the jobs require ingenuity, even for some of the more distasteful chores. For example, the Indiana Jones Adventure ride relies on nearly 1,000 black lights that shine on painted mesh screens to create floating ghost images.

But the effect is marred when guests sometimes spit at the ghosts, and the saliva ends up on the screens where it glows under black lights. Because typical cleaning products bleach the screens, David Graefen, the ride's service manager, said his crew created a special saliva-cleaning solution.

Park workers have also found a resourceful way to remove other unwanted guests ? rodents.

Years ago ? no one seems to know when ? feral cats began to sneak into the park, living among the park's trees and shrubs during the day. At night, they venture out, and an estimated 200 cats now prowl through Disneyland and neighboring California Adventure Park.

But instead of evicting the cats, Disneyland's animal wranglers work to control the feline population by spaying and neutering the adult cats and finding homes for all kittens born in the resort. The cats eat at five permanent feeding stations installed throughout the two parks.

"We are not trying to get rid of them," said Gina Mayberry, manager of Disneyland's Circle D ranch, where the park's animals are housed. "They keep the rodent population down."

Other nighttime visitors are not so welcome. Before maintenance crews take over, security workers sweep through the park to find guests hoping to spend the night. (Don't even try hiding on Tom Sawyer's Island ? park security knows all the hiding places.)

"If someone tried to hide, they would not stay hidden for long," said Disneyland spokeswoman Suzi Brown.

The primary goal of the after-hours crew is to pursue Disney's vision of an immaculate land, free of the litter and grime of the outside world.


#IStandWithUkraine


“God just sat down and smiled after he made cats.”~Richard Dawkins

A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.
– Lewis Gannett

Phyl

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5758
  • Maggie lives in Nashville,Tennessee Music City USA
    • https://parler.com @Phylll
Re: Pets
« Reply #6 on: March 12, 2022, 04:08:43 AM »

A true and engaging story of how a man at the bottom saves a cat's life and inturn gets rescued himself.
The story of 'A Street Cat Named Bob' has been made into, two motion pictures and numerous books authored by Bowen.
And, several magazine articles, numerous television appearances and a royal visit by Dutchess Catherine .


https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2227639/James-Bowen-Best-selling-true-story-busker-got-life-track-thanks-stray-cat-film.html
From Wikipedia article on James Bowen:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Bowen_(author)

Bob known for his penchant for scarfs . And, his famous 'kitty hand shake'.










Meeting Bob
In spring 2007, Bowen was enrolled on a methadone programme, begging and busking in Covent Garden, and living in a supported housing programme in Tottenham, London. One evening he returned home to find a ginger cat in the hallway of his building. Assuming it belonged to another resident, he simply returned to his flat. When the cat was still there the following day, and the day after that, Bowen became concerned and discovered the cat was wearing no collar or ID tag, was too thin, had a very unhealthy coat, scratches on its face and an infected wound on his leg. Bowen checked with other residents to see if the stray belonged to any of them, and when none of them claimed ownership of the animal Bowen decided to help the cat.

According to the account in A Street Cat Named Bob, Bowen took the cat to the nearby RSPCA clinic, which provided antibiotics to treat the infected wound (which he barely could afford). To make sure the cat received the full two-week course of medication, Bowen took him in for a time, while he continued to look for the stray's owner. When he couldn't find any information, he released the cat back on to the street, hoping he'd find his own way home. Instead, the cat began to follow Bowen around, even following him onto the bus when he left to go busking. Concerned that the cat had nowhere else to go, Bowen took him in permanently, naming him Bob after the character Killer BOB from the television drama Twin Peaks.[4]

Since Bob constantly followed James when he was going to work, he got him a harness for safety and allowed him to come along to his regular spots in Covent Garden and Piccadilly Circus, travelling in the window seat of the number 73 bus. The public reaction was positive and the pair became famous, their visibility increasing still further when Bowen began selling The Big Issue. The public began uploading videos of Bowen and Bob to YouTube, and tourists would visit Covent Garden to see them. During this time, Bowen decided to conclude his methadone treatment. He credits this development to Bob, saying "I believe it came down to this little man. He came and asked me for help, and he needed me more than I needed to abuse my own body. He is what I wake up for every day now. He’s definitely given me the right direction to live my life."[5]

Bob was kept as an indoor cat in his later life, occasionally being walked in his harness in a local park by James. A purpose-built catio was commissioned by James to allow Bob secure access to their garden.[6]

On Saturday 13 June 2020, Bob was fed in the kitchen of their home in Surrey, and last seen at approximately 11:00 p.m., before James noticed he was missing half an hour later.[7] On Monday 15 June 2020, two days after going missing, Bob was found dead at the side of a road around half a mile from his home. The cause of death was determined to be haematoma from a head-on collision with a car, the driver of which remains unknown.[8] He was thought to be aged at least 14 to 15 years old.

Earlier in 2020, Bob had finished filming his scenes for A Gift From Bob,[9] the sequel to the 2016 film adaptation.

Bob the Street Cat and James Bowen story:
https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/13188301/street-cat-named-bob-death-james-bowen
#IStandWithUkraine


“God just sat down and smiled after he made cats.”~Richard Dawkins

A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.
– Lewis Gannett