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Author Topic: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee  (Read 9344 times)

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #105 on: October 09, 2021, 12:58:59 AM »

Bluebird of happiness*,  Wikipedia article, continued

The bluebird is also mentioned in The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya episode "The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya Part III" in 2006.

Musician Neil Young has a song "Beautiful Bluebird" about a lost love on his 2007 album Chrome Dreams II.

"Blue Bird" is a song by Hope Sandoval & the Warm Inventions from their 2009 album Through the Devil Softly.

A blue bird like device can be found in "The Bluebird of Zappiness" a 2010 episode of Cyberchase. The main antagonist of the episode, which is Ledge now that Hacker has teamed up with the main protagonists to form an temporary alliance, dream is to discover the bluebird before Hacker does. They all want to find it, so they wake up at dawn, coincidentally because the episode is all about finding the length of your shadows. Inez, a girl, tries to beat Ledge, a boy, to the device, but ultimately there's a tie and it gets lost once again.

The character Luna from the 2012 video game and visual novel Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward wears a necklace with a caged bluebird, and the story is discussed in one ending.

The titular bluebird of the song "Birds", from the 2013 album Government Plates by the experimental hip hop group Death Grips, is thought to be referencing Charles Bukowski's poem "Bluebird", wherein the bluebird represents the vulnerability that Bukowski felt as a result of child abuse from his father.[8]

The bluebird is also mentioned by David Bowie in the song "Lazarus" from his 2016 album Blackstar.

In the 2018 video game Red Dead Redemption 2, during the scene where John Marston builds the ranch at Beecher's Hope, a bluebird is seen perched next to the gang while they are hammering and nailing the wood.

In a cartoon from Gary Larson, the (absent) bluebird of happiness is mentioned as counterpart of the "chicken of depression".

Bluebirds in nature
Three species of blue-headed North American thrushes (Turdidae) occupy the genus Sialia. The most widespread and best-known is the eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis), breeding from Canada's prairie provinces to Texas and from the Maritimes to Florida; discrete populations of this species are also found from southeastern Arizona through west Mexico into Guatemala and Nicaragua. The mountain bluebird (S. currucoides) breeds on high-elevation plains from central Alaska to Arizona and New Mexico, and the western bluebird (S. mexicana) inhabits dry coniferous forests from extreme southwestern Canada to Baja California and from the Great Basin south into west Mexico. Other all-blue birds in North and Central America are the blue mockingbird, blue bunting, indigo bunting, blue grosbeak and a number of jays, including the blue jay.

Europe has only a few birds with conspicuous blue in the plumage, including the great tit (Parus major), the various blue tits of the genus (Cyanistes) and the common kingfisher. The adult male of the blue rock-thrush is the only European passerine with all-blue plumage; this species is best known from its literary treatment by Giacomo Leopardi, whose poem Il passero solitario makes of the rock-thrush a figure of the poet's isolation.[9]

In South and Southeast Asia, the fairy-bluebirds, blue whistling thrush and verditer flycatcher are strikingly blue.


]*Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 




'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #106 on: October 09, 2021, 12:59:44 AM »

Bluebird of happiness*,  Wikipedia article, continued
Poems mentioning bluebirds

The world rolls round,—mistrust it not,—
Befalls again what once befell;
All things return, both sphere and mote,
And I shall hear my bluebird's note,
And dream the dream of Auburn dell.

— Ralph Waldo Emerson, May-Day, 1867


And when that day dawns, or sunset reddens how joyous we
shall all be! Facts will be regarded as discreditable, Truth will be
found mourning over her fetters, and Romance, with her temper
of wonder, will return to the land. The very aspect of the world
will change to our startled eyes. Out of the sea will rise
Behemoth and Leviathan, and sail round the high-pooped
galleys, as they do on the delightful maps of those ages when
books on geography were actually readable. Dragons will wander
about the waste places, and the phoenix will soar from her nest of
fire into the air. We shall lay our hands upon the basilisk, and see
the jewel in the toad’s head. Champing his gilded oats, the
Hippogriff will stand in our stalls, and over our heads will float
the Blue Bird singing of beautiful and impossible things, of
things that are lovely and that never happened, of things that are
not and that should be. But before this comes to pass we must
cultivate the lost art of Lying.

— Oscar Wilde, The Decay of Lying, 1891

References
 Cahill, Suzanne. "Performers and Female Taoist Adepts: Hsi Wang Mu as the Patron Deity of Women in Medieval China" in Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 106, No. 1, Sinological Studies, p. 155-168.
 Welch, Patricia Bjaaland. Chinese Art: A Guide to Motifs and Visual Imagery. Tokyo: Tuttle Publishing, 2008, p. 204.
 Rea, 2008: Wings in the Desert.
 Mawdsley, E. (2005). The Russian Civil War. p. 21.
 Duggan, Anne E.; Haase, Donald; Callow, Helen J., eds. (2016). Folktales and Fairy Tales: Traditions and Texts from around the World. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1610692543.
 Henry Rose, Maeterlinck's Symbolism. The Blue Bird and other essays., Dodd Mead & Co., 1911
 https://genius.com/The-velvet-underground-candy-says-lyrics
 "Bluebird - Charles Bukowski". Genius.
 Snow, David W.; Perrins, Christopher M.; Doherty, Paul; Cramp, Stanley (1998). The complete birds of the western Palaearctic on CD-ROM. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-268579-1.



]*Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 



'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #107 on: October 13, 2021, 02:12:57 AM »

Saw the new 'Mom and Dad' bluebirds yesterday late afternoon. Both perched on the feeder pole in the backyard.
As one would have it with Maggie our kitty being 'under the weather' so-to -speak. I forgot to bring my iPhone downstrairs.
Jim was home from work and jogged up to get it as well as the charger/cord.
Alas, dad had flown off and left mom 'all alone'.   :(

Now we know why the pair have been scarce-- the young Mockingbirds from this last clutch of the 2021 season have remained.
ANd they are full of themselves with attitude.  So much that they taken to running off the other birds/song birds!   >:(
These four also fight amoung themselve frequently. Probably for leadership.
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #108 on: October 16, 2021, 06:34:41 AM »


Just don't get any cute-er than these!
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #109 on: October 18, 2021, 07:56:58 PM »

Advice for New Bluebirders
Source: http://www.sialis.org/new.htm

"There is a wealth of information and varying opinions on how to attract and enable successful bluebird nesting. However, sometimes too much information can be overwhelming for the beginner. Here is some bottom line advice. If you don't do these things, your odds of success will be much lower.

NESTBOX: Buy or build a well-constructed nestbox specifically designed for bluebirds. Moisture should not be able to enter a nestbox during a storm. [Also see footnote a]. See plans.
GET EDUCATED: Learn from the experiences of others. Read about the basics. Buy a good book on bluebirds (e.g., The Bluebird Monitor's Guide) that explains how to identify birds, nests and eggs, correctly monitor an active nestbox, and prevent/deal with problems.
Contact a bluebirding association or check out an online bluebirding forum.
Expect to make some mistakes and even have some disasters, but don't give up. Many successful bluebirders made lots of mistakes in the beginning - e.g., putting a nestbox made out of cardboard on a tree stump surrounded by bread crumbs that attracted House Sparrows. See Frequently Asked Questions.
PLACEMENT: Put the box up - it won't attract bluebirds if it's sitting in your garage. Put it in a somewhat open, grassy area.[c] Face the entrance away from prevailing winds, in an area protected from excessive heat during summer months. If it's not on your property, get permission first. Put boxes 50-300 feet away from brushy areas to avoid problems with House Wrens.
SAFETY:  Mount the box so that nesting birds are protected from predators such as cats, rats, snakes, raccoons (e.g., put a predator guard on a metal mounting pole), and vandals.  Don't use pesticides in or around boxes.
KILLER BIRDS: Learn to identify, and take steps as necessary to manage House Sparrows (see www.sialis.org/hosp.htm) and starlings. These pest birds are not native and must not be allowed to nest in your box. Any other (native) bird is protected by law, and their nests/eggs cannot be disturbed.
MONITOR. Monitoring includes opening the nestbox at periodic intervals, being able to recognize problems, and taking appropriate action, if necessary. 
REHABBER:  If problems or injuries occur to birds, you will need to quickly locate a local licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Jot down your first-choice and an alternate rehabber and keep it in a convenient location. See https://www.humanesociety.org/resources/how-find-wildlife-rehabilitator for a list of rehabbers by state or contact your State wildlife management/environmental protection agency.[d]
CLEAN out the nestbox periodically (e.g., after babies have fledged).[e]
Also see my Top Ten tips on attracting bluebirds, to increase your odds.

Footnotes with more information:

[a] As a test, you can put the box under a sprinkler for a few hours. See links to Nestbox Plans.

MORE INFORMATION AND HELP: Benefit from lessons learned by others by reading books, joining a bluebirding forum, and/or joining a bluebirding society. A state or local bluebird organization can provide region-specific advice. In-depth information on all bluebird-related topics can be found in the archives of Best of Bluebird-L at http://www.bestofbbml.audubon-omaha.org/index.htm. Topics are organized under a Table of Contents and can be read by anyone, anytime. If you have ANY bluebird-related question, need a quick response in an emergency, or simply want to connect with other bluebirders, you can join an online bluebird forum.

« Last Edit: October 18, 2021, 07:58:55 PM by Phyl »
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #110 on: October 18, 2021, 07:58:29 PM »

Advice for New Bluebirders continued
Source: http://www.sialis.org/new.htm

Other resources:

Detailed tips and tools at Basics, Resources, the Nestbox Handout, or the Bluebird Information Flyer See NABS fact sheets at http:// nabluebirdsociety.org/facts.htm and more info on this website - http://www.sialis.org
Book recommendations: My favorite is The Bluebird Monitor's Guide. (Great photos too.). If you are looking for a very short book on basics, Enjoying Bluebirds More by Zickefoose is an oldie but goodie.
Bluebird Societies
Online bluebird forums and listservs
[c] Install nestboxes away from thickets if House Wrens are in your area.

[d] Your local rehabber would probably appreciate a call from you well in advance of the busy nesting season, to provide directions to the facility/home, tips on transporting injured birds and how to keep them warm, as well as other tips and preferences.

[e] Dispose of the nest away from the nestbox or in the trash to avoid attracting predators."
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #111 on: October 19, 2021, 03:50:03 AM »

WILDLIFE REHABILITATION & EMERGENCY BABY BIRD CARE

Source:   http://www.sialis.org/


Quick Tips: If you find an orphaned or injured bird, do not try to care for it yourself- it is illegal and you will probably end up killing it, despite your good intentions. Instead, immediately contact a licensed wildlife rehabilitator - find the closest one near you that handles songbirds:Wildlife Rehabilitation Information Center - to find a wildlife rehabber. In the meantime, put it in a shoebox covered lightly with a towel, and keep it warm, and do NOT give it any liquids. A prematurely fledged bird can be put in an artificial nest/birdcage near where the nest was to allow the parents to care for it until it is ready for release.

Wildlife Rehabilitators
If you find an ill or injured bird (or other critter), it is crucial to the animal's survival that it be given to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator. It is not legal to keep and care for the animal unless you are a licensed rehabilitator. Under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, it is illegal to posses a wild native bird (or their nests, eggs or young) without a permit.

To find a rehabber nearest you, see link below. Most states have a Department of Natural Resources/Wildlife website which lists licensed Rehabilitators or phone numbers. Local Audubon chapters, some bird clubs, Wild Bird Centers, Humane Societies, and local animal control officers may have names. Or you can call your local nature center, or a bird specialty store. For ORPHANED BLUEBIRD NESTLINGS only, contact a bluebird society near you to see if they can foster a baby in an existing nest - see list.

Websites to Locate:The Wildlife Rehabilitation Information Center - find a wildlife rehabber

To capture a sick or injured songbird, use a barrier, or try to lure it onto a porch or into a garage with food scattered on the ground, and then throw a T-shirt or pillowcase over it and gently but firmly pick it up through the cloth. (If you use a towel, broken feathers or toenails could get caught in the loops.)

For transportation, put the bird in a small bowl or ventilated shoe box lined with tissue, a paper towel, or a coffee filter, covered with a towel, and keep it warm, away from people and pets. Keep the radio and A/C off, and do not smoke in the vehicle while transporting the bird.

If you have nestboxes in your yard or are a bluebird trail monitor, being prepared for an emergency is important. Some rehabbers have had to close down due to lack of funding, so checking things out before the panic is crucial. Find your closest rehabber now who handles songbirds - before the emergency occurs. See story of Mr. Troyer. If you cannot locate a rehabber who will take the bird, it may be best to just let nature take its course. Not every bird can be saved. See more information about preventing future problems.

By the way, rehabbers that work with songbirds are not funded by the government. Almost all work independently (i.e., are not associated with a large nature center or organization) and must use their own money, time and resources to feed, house and treat the creatures they try to rescue. Some animals cannot be released into the wild, and require long term care. So if you do bring a animal to a rehabber, please consider donating something to them, to help them continue to operate. Money is great. They can also probably use in-kind donations like food - just ask them what they could use and drop it off. It's a great way to make a difference.

More Information:

Animal Help Now - Emergency Resource  https://ahnow.org/#/

The Wildlife Rehabilitation Information Center - find a wildlife rehabber https://petkeen.com/how-to-locate-a-wildlife-rehabilitator/
wildliferehabber.org - locate a rehabber (may not be as up to date as the one above)
NWRA (National Wildlife Rehabilitation Association) - see "need help" on top right https://www.nwrawildlife.org/default.aspx
Clinic for Rehabilitation of Wildlife  http://crowclinic.org/
International Wildlife Rehabilitation Council http://www.sialis.org/mbta.htm]https://theiwrc.org/[url]
Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Sialis.org  [url] http://www.sialis.org/mbta.htm]
Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Sialis.org  [url] http://www.sialis.org/mbta.htm]https://theiwrc.org/[url]
Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Sialis.org  [url] http://www.sialis.org/mbta.htm

Local, State and National Bluebird Societies  http://www.nabluebirdsociety.org/affiliates/
« Last Edit: October 19, 2021, 03:56:13 AM by Phyl »
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #112 on: October 19, 2021, 03:56:44 AM »

WILDLIFE REHABILITATION & EMERGENCY BABY BIRD CARE continued
Source:   http://www.sialis.org/

Emergency Baby Bluebird Care- 911!

NEVER give baby songbirds water or liquids - they can inhale it and die. Return the bird to its nest if you can do so safely or get the bird to a licensed wildlife rehabber ASAP.
Tips for interim baby bird care information are provided only as a temporary resource for care until the bird can be delivered to - or picked up by - a trained, licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Read everything below before taking action! Note that these instructions apply to small cavity nesting songbirds (primarily bluebirds) - other types of birds (like hummingbirds, pigeons and doves, or raptors) require different care or handling.

A lot of times what we think is an emergency is not really (e.g., the last bluebird takes a day or two longer to fledge than its' nest mates, but the parents are still caring for it and there is nothing wrong with it.)

Birds of Prey/Birds with Long Pointed Beaks: The instructions below apply to songbirds. Injured raptors (e.g., hawks, owls) and birds with long pointed beaks (e.g., herons) could seriously injure you, so do NOT handle them - call a wildlife rehabber or your State wildlife agency.


NEVER give baby songbirds water or liquids - they can inhale it and die.
 Return the bird to its nest if you can do so safely or get the bird to a licensed wildlife rehabber ASAP.

« Last Edit: October 20, 2021, 01:43:56 AM by Phyl »
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #113 on: October 20, 2021, 01:28:32 AM »

WILDLIFE REHABILITATION & EMERGENCY BABY BIRD CARE continued
Source:   http://www.sialis.org/

Baby birds on the ground that can't fly
If you find nestlings on the ground with little or no feathering, it is best to try to return them to the nest. No human can care for nestlings, and help prepare them for the real world as well as their natural bird parents. Baby animals that become habituated to humans often do not do well when released in the wild - rehabbers know how to avoid this. Their parents are unlikely to reject the babies just because you have touched them. If the nest is in a tall tree, make sure you can return it safely (e.g., use a sturdy ladder that is held by someone else.)

To make an artificial nest: If you can't reach the nest but can see it:

Take a small, shallow basket or a small berry container, or a margarine container with small drainage holes poked in the bottom.
Line it with dry pine needles so the baby is well supported. You don't want their legs to splay, or feet to slip through holes. Also, the edges should not be sharp, as some babies will try to defecate over the edge of the nest to help keep it clean.
Nail it to a tree as close as possible to where you found the baby.
Put the baby inside.
Then observe from a distance to see if the parents come to care for it. They will typically come feed it until it is ready to fledge.
NOTE: An alternative is to put the premature fledgling in a small wire bird cage, like the kind you can buy at any pet store. If it doesn't have a plastic roof, attach a piece of cardboard with zip ties. Hang it up next to the nestbox/tree where the nest was. The parents will typically feed their baby through the bars, and then it can be released as soon as it is ready. (Do not put food/water in the cage, as nestling birds cannot feed themselves, and get moisture from their food/parents.) Bird parents can take care of their young much better than you can.

NOTE: COLD nestlings must be warmed before they are returned to a nest. Make a temporary nest with a small bowl lined with lots of paper towels or coffee filters so the baby is well supported. Place the nestling inside, cover it lightly with a soft cloth, and place it on a heating pad set on low and put it under half of the artificial nest (so the baby can move away if it gets too warm). Or you can fill a smooth sock with rice and microwave it - it should be warm to the touch but not hot - and put it under a T-shirt of paper towel, and place it under or with the baby. When babies feel warm and are opening their mouths for food, return them to the nest.

A feathered bird with short wings and a short tail found on the ground is probably a fledgling. Parents will continue to care for them, so unless there are obvious injuries, leave the bird alone. If it clearly cannot fly and you are able to drop a T-shirt or pillowcase over it, you can place it in a tree to prevent it from being attacked by cats or dogs. If the bird is calling loudly with no parent responding, observe it for 2 hours before rescuing.

If the young have prematurely fledged from a nestbox (before they are able to fly), stuff a sock in the entrance hole for about 10 minutes after returning them to the nest, so they calm down. Despite that, they may jump out again. More on premature
« Last Edit: October 20, 2021, 01:44:19 AM by Phyl »
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #114 on: October 20, 2021, 01:29:46 AM »

WILDLIFE REHABILITATION & EMERGENCY BABY BIRD CARE continued
Source:   http://www.sialis.org/

Abandoned Nest - Orphaned Songbird

Before attempting to rescue a baby bird, you must make sure it is truly orphaned. Observe a nest you THINK might be abandoned for 2 hours before rescuing. Parents may fly in and out of nest within seconds while feeding. Nestlings can live 24 hours without food. See more on widows/widowers and what to do if one or both parents are gone.

If the bird is clearly orphaned, and does need to be rescued bring it to a licensed wildlife rehabilitator as soon as possible. Some rehabbers are very busy (many mouths to feed, other jobs, etc.) and may not return calls right away.

In the interim:

Put the orphaned bird in a small box or bowl lined with a paper towel or coffee filter that can be changed out underneath, cover it lightly with a smooth cloth (this will help it conserve heat and prevent it from becoming even more stressed- darkness calms them down), and keep it warm (e.g., sit the container on a heating pad set on LOW or use a warmed sock filled with rice - see above.)
Keep it away from people and pets and avoid handling it, which will stress it out even further.
You should not put anything in the baby's mouth. NEVER give baby songbirds water or liquids - they can inhale it and die. Songbird nestlings get their moisture from food (unlike pigeons and doves.)
Do not put food or liquid into the container - baby birds do not feed themselves.
Never feed anything to an animal that is debilitated or dehydrated - even if it is begging. Food fed to a cold bird can sit in its crop and ferment because their digestive system is shutting down. They need to be re-hydrated using a special solution, by a licensed wildlife rehabber.
It is best not to feed the bird - as noted above, they can go 24 hours without eating. Each type of bird has different dietary requirements. Most songbird nestlings eat insects, but some like House Finches don't.
If for some reason you are unable to immediately find a wildlife rehabber that takes songbirds, you can feed bluebirds or other insect eaters for a day or two with some chopped mealworms (usually available at pet stores) or other insects (flies, crickets, grasshoppers, moths), supplemented with some chopped cooked (cooled to room temperature) egg whites (no yolk), ideally dusted with some crushed Calcium Citrate.
Use a pair of tweezers to put the food into the babies mouth.
Never feed earthworms to baby bluebirds - it can make them very sick or kill them.
Avoid waxworms as they are big and could cause choking if fed to small birds, and are hard to cut up (they turn into a slimy mess.)
SOMETIMES it is possible to "foster" an orphaned bird into an active nest if it is the same species (e.g., a bluebird nestling in a bluebird nest), and the birds are the same age (or the orphan is a day or two older) - see more info.
I'll say it again - get any orphaned or injured wild bird to a licensed wildlife rehabber as soon as you possibly can. Do not attempt to raise a wild baby bird. Many are killed by good intentions and might have survived if brought to a trained professional. Under no circumstances try to make a pet out of a wild native bird.



« Last Edit: November 05, 2021, 01:37:54 AM by Phyl »
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #115 on: November 02, 2021, 03:28:55 PM »

We were blessed this last Friday, October 29th with a visit from two of our bluebirds from the second clutch of the 2021 nesting season!




Bluebird female, CR-47 .
Paid us a visit  along with CR-44, her brother. They have been gone several months. So nice to see them again.

'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #116 on: November 02, 2021, 03:32:03 PM »


Bluebird female CR-47  and a male cardinal next to peanut feeder jar.
10-29-21 CR-47 and her brother CR-44 paid us a visit Friday morning October 29.


'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #117 on: November 02, 2021, 03:33:45 PM »


Bluebird male, CR-44  on 10-29-21
CR-44 and his sister, CR-47 this past Friday paying us a visit after being gone for several months.

'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #118 on: November 02, 2021, 03:39:00 PM »

Slightly different view as CR-47  turned a way to look at nesting box #1 just out of camera view.
There was alot of mockingbird activity when the BBs showed up. When the 2022 nesting season commences the BBs
will stand their ground or shall I say airspace and carry on!   :-* :-* :-* :-*

Bluebird male, CR-44 on feeder pole 10-29-21 of 2nd clutch 2021 season
CR-44 and his sister, CR-47 paid us a visit this last Friday 


'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale

Phyl

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  • Maggie lives in Nashville,Tennessee Music City USA
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Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
« Reply #119 on: November 11, 2021, 02:33:36 AM »

Sorry I'm so slow in posting photos. But, alot going on here, there and everywhere. LOL
I was busy doing some household chores. And, learning from past experioences I had my iPhone with me and charged!

Here is CR-47 visiting us on Thursday, 11-4-21
'Which is more beautiful — feline movement or feline stillness?' Elizabeth Hamilton

'A man who never sees a bluebird only half lives.'
Edwin Way Teale