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Author Topic: New developments in the field of science  (Read 26317 times)

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2015, 04:34:32 PM »

gg - what am amazing young man Tristan Picotte is!  What an interesting, inspiring article!  I see him accomplishing wonderful things in his life and much in the name of saving species of animals.  He is compassionate and understands the challenges our world creates with the environment and wildlife.  I see him having a definite, positive, long-lasting impact, somehow in some way.

You and T-40 got me looking more closely at Environmental Health News and I zoned in on "Winged Warnings" articles.  Here's something interesting to read about deformed beaks appearing in Chickadees in Alaska and how it could be caused by a new virus. I hope they figure this one out for the sake of the birds:

http://www.environmentalhealthnews.org/ehs/news/2014/aug/wingedwarnings6deformed-chickadees

LOL!  I went right to "Winged Warnings" too, glogdog!
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2015, 09:26:57 PM »

We certainly didn't do the bald eagle any favors by removing it from the Endangered Species Act, because Federal agency approvals like this don't have to consider the effects on eagles any more!

http://www.enewspf.com/latest-news/science/science-a-environmental/59011-epa-approval-of-dow-s-enlist-duo-herbicide-violates-endangered-species-act.html
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

glogdog

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #17 on: February 13, 2015, 10:54:40 PM »

Handle with Care - I'm glad some of these issues of what's found at the local garbage dump are being brought to the forefront. 

T40 - thank goodness for the farmers and environmental groups trying to stop that decision to use that herbicide.  Here's hoping they are successful!
« Last Edit: February 13, 2015, 11:04:22 PM by glogdog »
glogdog

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #18 on: February 13, 2015, 10:54:58 PM »

glogdog

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #19 on: February 19, 2015, 03:00:30 AM »

Well, this is very scary news.  Infected coots are killing bald eagles.  :-\

http://news.uga.edu/releases/article/identify-name-toxic-cyanobacteria-killing-american-bald-eagles-0215/
« Last Edit: July 11, 2016, 10:10:42 AM by T40cfr403 »
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #20 on: February 28, 2015, 10:21:20 AM »

This is too good not to pass on - researchers used the equivalent of tin foil hats to study how birds use the earth's magnetic field to navigate.  ;D

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150227131003.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily+%28Latest+Science+News+--+ScienceDaily%29
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2015, 07:25:22 PM »

Thought provoking, isn't it Bird obsession?  I swear I can tell time by my cats when their internal dinner bell goes off.  ;)  The researchers did point out there's probably something else going on with memories about food caches and couldn't comment on learned behavior or training.  And crows truly are amazing, I agree, as well as chimps (Chimp Eden bias there, maybe).

The paper is a meta-analysis of previous specific research, so I'm taking their findings with a grain of salt.  They couldn't say much about birds in general because most of the research had been done on pigeons, for example.  I'm assuming their statistical analysis is accurate, but I think we're a loooong ways from understanding how our furry, feathered and scaly friends think!  I enjoyed your observations!

« Last Edit: March 02, 2015, 08:16:39 AM by T40cfr403 »
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #22 on: March 05, 2015, 08:16:28 PM »

« Last Edit: March 05, 2015, 08:19:09 PM by T40cfr403 »
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2015, 05:48:59 PM »

This is such a good article from Audubon!  It's cutting-edge research in a highly informative, entertaining and readable format.  (I've always thought eaglets in their gray-cottonball-down-clown-feet stage look positively prehistoric. If I'm not looking at a dinosaur, it's pretty darn close.)

Which Came First: the Dinosaur or the Bird?

https://www.audubon.org/magazine/january-february-2015/which-came-first-dinosaur-or-bird?utm_source=engagement&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2015-03-19_email_wingspan
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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« Last Edit: April 03, 2015, 01:16:36 PM by T40cfr403 »
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #26 on: April 03, 2015, 01:13:13 PM »

More on crows:  http://b.oooom.net/1snq | http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2015/02/backyard-crows-bring-gifts-to-8-year-old-girl-who-feeds-them-its-showing-me-how-much-they-love-me/

Included in the story:

'The birds often leave behind shiny trinkets -- earrings, buttons, hinges, polished rocks -- small enough to fit into their mouths, reported BBC.

'Gabi said a bird once left behind part of a necklace with the word "best" printed on it.'
There are so many interesting stories of crows and research on their intelligence.  The more I rad about them, the more I think it would be to have a wild crow "aquintance."

 Here is a link to how crows can gather to "mourn" their dead: http://www.mi-reporter.com/news/255359471.html#

Thanks, Bird for the link. If only I had had internet the day I saw this behavior with my very own eyes.

I heard several crows causing a ruckus, so I looked out my window to see what all the commotion was about.  I was startled and mesmerized by what I saw.  There was an obviously dead crow on my sidewalk and a group of 6-7 crows had encircled the body and were calling out loudly.  At one point, the circle all turned their backs on their dead friend and called out once again as if to announce to anyone listening, "Fred is dead! Fred is dead! Long live Fred!"  I was sure I was witnessing a funeral ceremony.  An avid birder friend of mine had never heard of this behavior but it has stayed with me all these years later.
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

baziunc

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #27 on: April 03, 2015, 03:37:41 PM »

Neat story T40.  So cool you got to witness that.
"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift, that is why it is called the present."   ― A.A. Milne

"Hope for the best and accept what comes." ― President Jimmy Carter, on Aug. 20, 2015, during press conference at The Carter Center

T40cfr403

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #28 on: April 03, 2015, 05:47:39 PM »

Black vultures making a comeback in Portugal but there are still worries.

http://phys.org/news/2015-04-black-vultures-southern-portugal.html
Only within the moment of time represented by the present century has one species -- man -- acquired significant power to alter the nature of the world.
― Rachel Carson, Silent Spring

baziunc

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Re: New developments in the field of science
« Reply #29 on: April 11, 2015, 06:17:20 PM »

The subject of Siblicide and aggression among nestlings often comes up when the bonking starts among nestmates in the Decorah nest, and some other nests we may follow.  There is a thread in Forum (on the "Other Raptors Cams" board) for the Black Eagles of South Africa (also known as Therreaux's Eagles), and the first egg was laid today in that nest.  When I mentioned it in another Forum thread today, another member cautioned people about watching that cam because siblicide is typical there and is an expected practice in that species, as well as parental aggression toward the fledgling to get it to leave the parental pair's territory.  This can be difficult to watch.

Anyway, that led me to discover and post the following info about Avian Siblicide.  There are two very different and distinct forms of avian siblicide - the type practiced by Black Eagles (and some other species of birds), which only lay two eggs, and almost always results in the death of the 2nd nestmate, and the other type that is related to environmental factors, which is the type sometimes (but not always) seen in some Bald Eagle nests, for example (and other species of birds), and is the type that can vary greatly even among a species.  Due to the very favorable environmental factors, such as a steady, year-round, ample supply of food, and parenting behavior, we haven't seen this in Mom and Dad Decorah's nest, even though there is aggression between the nestmates, which hasn't resulted in death in the Decorah nest.

...  ...  ...  ...  ...  ...  ...  Here's are some interesting things I have learned about avian siblicide...

The Verreaux's Eagles (Black Eagles) of South Africa usually only raise 1 chick per season.  Siblicide is typical behavior in their nests if they hatch more than one egg.  This is also true in some other species of birds.  As described by Douglas W. Mock, Hugh Drummond and Christopher H. Stinson, in their publication, "Avian Siblicide," "The black eagle is one of the first birds in which siblicide was described."  Another thing I learned from this article is that there are two very distinctly different forms of siblicide - one is known as obligate, and the other is known as facultative.  Obligate siblicide  is found in certain species that usually only ever lay two eggs and the first-hatched chick almost always kills the second one.  This is the type of siblicide found in Black (Therreaux's) Eagles, and some other types of birds.  The other type of siblicide, called facultative siblicide, is the kind that varies based on environmental factors (availability of food, etc.) - as can happen in some Bald Eagle nests (and other birds), and why we don't see it in Mom and Dad's Decorah nest, because of the abundance of food at that nest.  And this type of aggression varies widely among different populations of the same species - more so in some, and not at all in others 

That is a very informative article about Avian Siblicide, BUT...   **NOTE*** VIEWER ALERT***  There are photos of siblicide in that article, so you may choose not to look at that article ***  That article can be viewed without downloading it, and can be found at  http://www.academia.edu/3826423/Avian_Siblicide

(Douglas W. Mock is associate professor of zoology at the University of Oklahoma. He was educated at Cornell University and the University of Minnesota, where he received his Ph.D. in ecology and behavioral biology in 1976.  Hugh Drummond is a researcher in animal behavior at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. He was educated at Bristol University, the University of Leeds and the University of Tennessee, where he received his Ph.D. in psychology in 1980.  Christopher H. Stinson was educated at Swarthmore College, the College of William and Mary and the University of Washington, where he received his Ph.D. in 1982.)
« Last Edit: April 11, 2015, 06:54:50 PM by baziunc »
"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, but today is a gift, that is why it is called the present."   ― A.A. Milne

"Hope for the best and accept what comes." ― President Jimmy Carter, on Aug. 20, 2015, during press conference at The Carter Center