Raptor Resource Project Forum

BirdCam Forum => Other Bird Cams and Information => Topic started by: Phyl on July 14, 2021, 06:56:03 PM

Title: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 14, 2021, 06:56:03 PM
Since 2002 Jim and I have been providing nesting boxes for the Eastern Bluebirds of Tennessee. As well as making available meal worm feeder, seeds and a safe enviorment for them to rear their fledglings and live all year long.
These are cheery and amusing birds to watch. And, a joy to help during this time in our area of constant construction due to the mass migration from the Western United States into The Deep South.
I have endeavored to keep a ‘scientific’ method of documentation. I use a ‘scientific’ naming system similar to what is used in the monitoring of the raptors.

In the past, since 2011, I have posted updates only in the Beakroom here in RRP forum.
Now  I’d like to share the photos and notes with all the forum members.

I hope you enjoy them  as much as we  do  tacking,  documenting and 'providing' for them.

Our backyard is the very best place to view bluebirds in Old Hickory Hills. **

Note: All photographs are taken by myself and my husband. As such are our personal propery and are not authorized for use outside of this forum or any of it's threads. Thank you.

Eastern Bluebird

(https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/twra/images/birds/eastern-bluebird-006.jpg)
Male

(https://www.tn.gov/content/dam/tn/twra/images/birds/eastern-bluebird-004.jpg)
Female

The Eastern Bluebird was chosen for TWRA's Watchable Wildlife license plate because it is a common Tennessee bird that people have benefitted by putting up bluebird boxes.  This small thrush is a year round resident and can often be seen hunting along roadsides from a fence or low perch.
The breeding range of the Eastern Bluebird extends across the eastern half of North America southward into Central America. The northernmost nesters migrate to the southern part of the breeding range in winter.
The brilliant blue color of the male, the delightful call and familial behavior make the Eastern Bluebird one of the most popular songbirds in Tennessee. It is a permanent resident, though some birds may move short distances south from their breeding areas to avoid very cold temperatures.
Description: This medium-sized songbird has a large, round head, and a blue back, wings and tail.    The chest is orange, the lower belly is white, and the male is brighter than the female.Adult male: a brilliant blue above and rusty orange on the throat and breast, whitish belly  Female: gray-blue above and dull rust on the throat and breast, whitish belly  Juvenile: similar to adult female but grayish with a speckled breast  (May-August) 
Length: 7"
Wingspan: 13"
Weight: 1.1 oz
Voice: The song is a soft musical cheer cheerful charmer melody. The call notes are raspy and scolding.
Similar Species:
    • No other songbird in Tennessee has a blue back and orange breast.
Habitat: Open habitats with little or no groundcover such as orchards, open woodlands, clear-cuts, parks, and large lawns in suburban and rural areas.  It is often observed perched on wires, posts, and low branches scanning the ground for prey. It traditionally nested in naturally occurring tree cavities or cavities created by woodpeckers in trees or fence posts.
Diet: Arthropods caught on the ground including: caterpillars, beetles, crickets, grasshoppers, and spiders are the main diet. In fall and winter, bluebirds eat large amounts of fruit from native species such as poison ivy, sumac, black cherry, dogwood, hackberry, blueberries, and mistletoe.
Nesting and reproduction: Eastern Bluebirds are cavity nesters and typically have 2 broods each year, sometimes 3, and rarely 4 often use the same nest for all broods.  Bluebirds depend on naturally occurring cavities, tree cavities excavated by other species, or nest boxes. The female builds the nest of grasses, and lines it with finer material. Nest Box Instructions here.
Males attract females to the nest with a display in which he carries nesting material into and out of the cavity.   The breeding pair can stay together for several seasons.
Eastern Bluebirds suffer from competition with European Starlings and House Sparrows for nest sites, but the thousands of nest boxes that have been erected appear to off-set these detrimental effects (see link below for nest box designs that exclude starlings).
Clutch size: Usually 4 to 5 pale blue (or rarely, white) eggs. Female begins laying eggs a few days after the nest is completed and usually lays one per day.   In Tennessee first clutches are commonly laid in March, last clutches in July or August.
Incubation: The female incubates the eggs for 12 to 14 days.  Incubation does not start until after all eggs are laid so that all eggs hatch on the same day.
Fledging: The young are fed by both parents and fledge in 15 to18 days. Young produced in early nests usually leave their parents in summer, but young from later nests frequently stay with their parents over the winter.
Songs and Calls: Song is a soft, warbled "cheerful charmer". Call is a soft "tru-ly" when communication with mate or young. Also gives a raspy alarm call. 
Status in Tennessee: The Eastern Bluebird is a common permanent resident across the state though some individuals may migrate further south in winter. Populations appear to be stable, but vulnerable in especially severe winters.
Populations fell in the early 20th century due to many factors. Competition for nesting sites from introduced species, loss of open space and natural nesting cavities, increased pesticide use and climatic events contributed to the decline.
In the 1970's, conservation efforts to provide nest boxes specifically designed to keep out the larger European Starling combined with a campaign to provide and monitor boxes for use by invasive House Sparrows has helped with the recovery of the beloved species.
Dynamic map of Eastern Bluebird eBird observations in Tennessee
(https://www.tn.gov/content/tn/twra/wildlife/birds/grassland-and-shrub-birds/eastern-bluebird/jcr%3acontent/contentFullWidth/tn_panel/content/tn_columnctrl/column_parsys1/tn_image_1649573820.img.gif/1580852042323.gif)

Fun Facts:
    • The clutch size of Eastern Bluebirds varies with latitude and longitude. Bluebirds that nest farther north and farther west have larger clutches than southern nesters.
    • In especially cold weather, several individuals will roost together in one cavity to stay warm. This species has been observed using nest boxes to stay warm during cold winter nights, packing 8-12 individuals into one box.
    • The oldest known Eastern Bluebird in the wild was 10 years 6 months old.

**Best places to see in Tennessee: Eastern Bluebirds are found in every county in the state. Many state and local parks have "bluebird trails" with multiple bluebird houses.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 14, 2021, 06:59:08 PM
April15, 2021
The first bluebird nest of the 2021 season for our resident 'Mom and Dad'
Hatch babies and grow healthy to live long.  We'll do all we can for you all.
The story begins...we'll follow them in pictures. And,  make written reports.
Your humans love you!
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 14, 2021, 07:04:04 PM



April21, 2021
Blue Bird Report
Jim has visited NB#1 and the 5 egglets are intact with on pips.
He had my iPhone incase there had been some activitiy.
We will monitor this nest daily...'cuz you just never know.

4-17-2021
(https://i.pinimg.com/236x/28/a8/c7/28a8c7effba749088b94c23dcb14f29c.jpg)


(https://i.pinimg.com/236x/0f/7a/de/0f7ade8dc04e9cf72cab3eafb142cf09.jpg)

They'll be called OHH2021/NB1 BB31, OHH2021/NB1BB32, OHH2021/NB1 BB33 and so on.     Translated:  Old Hickory Hills 2021 Nesting Box1  Bluebird 31, etc. Or OHH  31, 32, 33, 34, 35


Our go to source for all things Bluebird.

(https://th.bing.com/th/id/OIP.HBdB82wdebCiooCSPC9H8gAAAA?w=213&h=100&c=7&o=5&pid=1.7)


http://bluebirdnut.com/

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:26:23 PM
April 28, 2021
Cane Ridge Bluebird Report


4-27-2021
CR-OHHBB 33 and   34
at bottom of photo, left to right


(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/6d/1b/96/6d1b96e6db999e8cbebc45549c1b7dfb.jpg)

When the weather is dry we'll check the nest again. The 5th egg may or may not be viable.
We'll the egglet have  a few more days to hatch.
If that's the case,  it will be removed. And, I'll say a few words of dedication and  Nature can claim it.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:26:55 PM
April 26, 2021
Cane Ridge/Old Hickory Hills Bluebird Report

Late Saturday or very early Sunday morning
4-25-21
Cane Ridge-Old Hickory Hills

Meet CR-OHH31 and 32 respectively
(https://i.pinimg.com/236x/74/ab/aa/74abaae8471556258e9068be2bdd40c9.jpg)
31 top in corner and 32 below .
Told Jim we need a cam from Bluebird nut
.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:27:27 PM
May 2, 2021
Cane Ridge, TN  Bluebird Report

5-01-21
CR-OHH 31, 32, 33, and 34
top left and down to right

(https://i.pinimg.com/236x/18/86/75/188675925b802a96f9530dc3fa34657f.jpg)


(https://i.pinimg.com/236x/53/6f/51/536f51728ab3c0216d63921ed3506155.jpg)
Jim has promised me the egg
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:28:17 PM
June 2, 2021
Cane Ridge Bluebird Report
Cane Ridge, Tennessee


All photos enlarge with a click.

A rain soaked dad today
(https://i.pinimg.com/originals/c2/af/a6/c2afa6ee49ccefe1cf79404e2412880d.jpg)

Our CR-HHO36 bluebird juvie on the mealworm feeder
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/c2/64/54/c264543057d5d1ef1eaff089683fe4ad.jpg)
Taken this past weekend
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:32:33 PM
Jim reports a new nest is full with four (4) blue eggs. He took a photo but didn't come out well. Will retake.
You recall we had 5 eggs just this last nest. With the 5th not viable. And, that while four fledged only two returned from 'flight school' and 'survival training'. But, since I never actually saw them fledge, which I usually do see. And, in view that Jim no longer uses the pad lock on the nesting boxes. I'm wondering if someone reached in and took two for some perverted reason. 
Because of t his, I can't actually be sure #35 and 36 are who I think they are. They could be #37 and 38; 35 and 37; 36 and 38 ;38 and 35 or 36 and 37. 
Alas, i'm not gonna fret over it.






June 8, 2021
Bluebird Report, Cane Ridge-Old Hickory Hills, Tennessee

Late getting this out.

But, as usual, we have a second clutch of eggs. As you can see, we have five lovely blue eggs that promise to
bring us CR #'s 39, 40, 41, 42 and 43. We can only hope all five will survive. We estimate the first egg to hatch about
the 12th or 13th and then, hopefully,  one each day there after.
Sure wish Jim would put the pad lock back on the nesting box.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/37/49/3d/37493d5ac665cf3fbccc1706ff142cde.jpg)

And, a photo update on the two surviving hatchlings from our  May clutch. CR #35 and 36.
Our two 2021 teenagers are self-feeding the meal worms (dried) from the windowed feeder box. And on rare occasion, visiting the squirrel feeder housing the shelled  peanut halves. They fly off with them or even more rare, take them to the deck rail and bust them up.  I think this is more  a copycat thing with the teenage Mockingbirds when, that pair raid the feeder. LOL
Look very closely and see the famous blue spreading up the tail and back. Their breasts are still white and when that turns to the reddish orange, the vividness of that and the wing blue  will tell us the gender. I hoping for a female at least.
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e4/18/2e/e4182e382a65751396ac6d0152f8fab1.jpg)



Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:36:42 PM
June 16, 2021
Cane Ridge-Old Hickory Hills Bluebird Repot
2021 nesting  Season
Taken 6-14-21 after Jim mowed

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/4a/9a/01/4a9a0195cbe8715fc72d65720ea38ee6.jpg)


Second clutch likely hatched about 3 days ago. 
Looks like all five!
So, welcome to the world CR-OHH  39, 40, 41, 42 and 43!
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:37:52 PM
June 25, 2021

Cane Ridge Bluebird Report, Cane Ridge, Tennessee
From Monday, June 21, 2021

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/27/2d/63/272d632c7731a927d243f6ad971b7376.jpg)
 Our second nest of this.Bluebird season And,  looks like all five cramed in the box.
CR-OHH #39-43 are looking good with their pin feathers.


(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e6/b2/fd/e6b2fd27b2629e77e44b1aaa7a499887.jpg)
Better view of Cane Ridge #39, 40, 41, 42 and 43.

Luv our Tennessee Western Bluebirds  :-* :-* :-* :-* :-* :-* :-* :-*

Fledging won't be too far off.


July 5, 2021

Bluebird Report, Cane Ridge, Tennessee
7-5-21
Morning
 I was tidying up the kitchen after breakfast and looked up from  cleaning the table to see our 2021 female perched on the deck rail looking at me. My iphone was charging on the counter.
By the time I retrived it and gently slid the door open, her attention was focused on the ribbon elms near the overflow.  Some times it's take what you can get with wildlife.
Our male arrived after his sister left  and was looking back at me as I stood there poised for another shot. A knock on the front door so  I left to anwser. Gone just a moment though, too long. 
And, he had moved to the 2nd nesting box.
These are the only two of the 4 fledglings that returned from the forsest and 'flight/survival' training. They have come 'home'  probably for a 'visit'.
Mom and Dad are 'acting' like they may want to go for third clutch. Not unusual but not that common either.
At any rate, the nesting box is all clean and sanitary if they so choose.

Click on each  photo to enlarge.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e3/4e/59/e34e592f8bc3a8c862ab42c4b63b0939.jpg)
Juvenile female, first clutch of 2021 nesting season.


(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/89/f1/26/89f1269aa738ee0f5a54aac3194c60e7.jpg)
Juvenile male, first clutch of 2021 nesting season.

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:38:34 PM
July 12, 2021
Bluebird Report, Cane Ridge, Tennessee

Blue birds 2nd clutch of 2021 nesting season.
Pictures were taken late last week.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/8b/12/d2/8b12d290347a1036fc9c7fe11b0dd8fc.jpg)
CR_OHH 44, 46 in foreground, 45 in middle and CR#47 far left.
Cr#48 is off somewhere?


(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/9e/93/d2/9e93d229f3e1e49d14a68092a2bd2b33.jpg)
CR-OHH 44 thru 47 (not in that order) with CR_OHH 48 on seed feeder pole in background.


(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/30/3e/3c/303e3c32e4bdd2ec5abae6851621b12a.jpg)
CR-OHH44 in the middle with #s 45, 46, 47 surround. CR-OHH48 is missing. I've deemed this one
as camera shy.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:39:50 PM
July 5, 2021

Bluebird Report, Cane Ridge, Tennessee
7-5-21
Morning
 I was tidying up the kitchen after breakfast and looked up from  cleaning the table to see our 2021 female perched on the deck rail looking at me. My iphone was charging on the counter.
By the time I retrived it and gently slid the door open, her attention was focused on the ribbon elms near the overflow.  Some times it's take what you can get with wildlife.
Our male arrived after his sister left  and was looking back at me as I stood there poised for another shot. A knock on the front door so  I left to anwser. Gone just a moment though, too long. 
And, he had moved to the 2nd nesting box.
These are the only two of the 4 fledglings that returned from the forsest and 'flight/survival' training. They have come 'home'  probably for a 'visit'.
Mom and Dad are 'acting' like they may want to go for third clutch. Not unusual but not that common either.
At any rate, the nesting box is all clean and sanitary if they so choose.

Click on each  photo to enlarge.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e3/4e/59/e34e592f8bc3a8c862ab42c4b63b0939.jpg)
Juvenile female, first clutch of 2021 nesting season.


(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/89/f1/26/89f1269aa738ee0f5a54aac3194c60e7.jpg)
Juvenile male, first clutch of 2021 nesting season.

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:40:56 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/50/d4/40/50d44025d55930869c72e7daf986f782.jpg)
This is CR-OHH 48, at left, hiding behind the deck newel post.  :-*

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/2c/eb/7b/2ceb7becfa9b07b6299855bfffb54a69.jpg)
Dad at far left with CR-OHH 48 (beak open) and #47 behind newel post profile barely visable.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/af/d6/90/afd6900b35fac06f7fc8ffe170626554.jpg)
CR-OHH48 on it's own after Dad and siblings flew off. Dad circled back and is perched on feeder pole background, right.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:42:51 PM
Part 2
Bluebird Report, Cane Ridge, Tennessee


The following photos were taken late last week as well.

CR-OHH 45 all on it's own. Still not sure the gender. Will have to wait for the breast to turn.
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/a6/8b/98/a68b98d2a215b4469e7b28183b3b1f26.jpg)

Big news!
A third clutch is now in the works ...
7-12-21
Photo  taken this afternoon about 4pm.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/a9/3a/8a/a93a8ae5acfdf300b3cdd3e1c5358a31.jpg)
This tiny egglet is named CR-OHH49.
So, Mom was off feeding and taking a break
We think this one must have been laid within the last 24 to 48 hours.
These cheery birds usualy lay one egg daily untill all fertilized eggs are in the nest.

So far for the  2021  season, this  bluebird pair have produced  10 hatchling and  nine (9)  surviving.
Remains to be seen how many this clutch will add to the BB population this Spring-Summer.

And...here we go, again!  ;)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 15, 2021, 03:47:03 PM
Okay. I think these are all  in timely order.
I have another photo, taken this morning by Jim of the nest inside the nesting box to post.
Will get to that soon.
Bear in mind the photo was taken 7-15-21.
A nice surprize awaits. No the egglet didn't magically hatch a proper bluebird chick.   ;D
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 17, 2021, 01:22:06 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/40/ee/58/40ee5891b84fe7ca1c8b2bc0532f378d.jpg)

Our third clutch with 3 pretty blue eggs. So...we now have Cane Ridge 49, 50 and 51 as of last Wednesday, 7-14-21.
If the rain pauses later this afternoon, Jim will go back opening up the nesting box and see what we have in there and how things are going.
He'll take a quick snap for me to post later.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 18, 2021, 05:56:42 PM
Our third clutch for this pair of bluebirds is doing nicely thus far.
Jim snaped this early this afternoon.
We now have four tiny eggs. And, it does'n't look like there'll be a fifth. You might recall that BBs lay an egg a day once on the nest untill all eggs are laid for the season, at that time.
Mom's been laying since  about the 13th So, we think number four was laid either late  yesterday or very early this morning.
We now have Cane Ridge # 49, 50, 51 and 52.    ;)

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d0/62/11/d06211457315307f50dd6f2b06d0f5fd.jpg)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 18, 2021, 06:56:45 PM
(https://th.bing.com/th/id/OIP.HBdB82wdebCiooCSPC9H8gAAAA?w=213&h=100&c=7&o=5&pid=1.7)

Bluebird Information:
The basics
http://bluebirdnut.com/bluebird-information/ (http://bluebirdnut.com/bluebird-information/)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 19, 2021, 06:36:28 PM
I was clearing breakfast dishes and looked out the deck doors as is my habit during nesting season and all.
What astonished me was one of our juvies, either #45 or #46 was on the deck rail with a chunk of shelled peanut in it's beak!
BBs don't, as far as I know, eat peanuts.  And, since we've changed over to  shelled ones there's been a run on them by mammals and avians alike.
Lo and behold, that juvie tilted it's head back and down that chunk went!
While standing there in awe, I reached back for my iphone to get a snap.
Darn, darn, darn! Not there *&@!$  Still up stairs.
Well...surely there will be a next time...has to be. B'cuz I don't think anyone would believe me with out one. ::)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: MpMom on July 20, 2021, 12:51:35 PM
Wow Phyliz, perfect report of your bluebirds!!! I know you have been doing this for years & you have the perfect place for them!.
I will have to ask Mindy if she has checked her bluebird boxes. So fun!!!
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 22, 2021, 07:06:08 AM
So glad to see a thread on Bluebirds. I have 5 boxes set up an an acre and a half here in central  NC. Been a bluebirder for years, and always have the mealworms out :)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 22, 2021, 07:13:01 AM
 ;)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 22, 2021, 07:13:29 AM
 ;)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 22, 2021, 07:14:03 AM
 ;)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 22, 2021, 09:02:21 AM

Jim did a quick look yesterday as he mowed. It's official, no new eggs so Mom's stop laying. She and Dad are busy taking turns on the nest. And, being food truck for juvies.
So, it's gonna be Cane Ridge # 49, 50, 51 and 52.     And, those kids should cap off the season. 
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d0/62/11/d06211457315307f50dd6f2b06d0f5fd.jpg)
I did a quick calculation in my head yesterday and we must have help bring into the world nigh on to 100 bluebirds in 20 years and spent over $1000.00
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 22, 2021, 09:13:41 AM
Phyliz........I keep checking a box of mine with 4 eggs. Going on two and a half weeks now, and no activity at the box. First time in 8 years that I've had eggs abandoned. Not sure if it was due to the late nesting or not. It is very warm, but the box is in the shade all day. Hope you have success with your late nest.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 22, 2021, 09:26:16 AM
Hi Raleigheagle and MpMom.
Nice to see you here.
Raleigh, so you don't see mom and dad bluebird activity at all?!  Do you have a baffle on the nesting box post? Jim made one of a clothes dryer vent and slipped it over the post before installing the box. Or a wire cage covering the entrance would keep preadators  from entering.  Wondering if someone kept disturbing the nest causing the parents to leave.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 22, 2021, 10:42:23 AM
Baffle and netting. I've found the netting to be much more effective at catching and stopping the black snakes. I lost three fledglings to a black snake years ago. I'll never make the mistake of leaving a box unprotected again. I even use vaseline on the inside roof of all the boxes, after seeing a nest abandoned (no eggs) to a paper wasp nest. Never had the problem again since I started with the vaseline early in the season.
I saw activity for the first few days after the eggs were laid....nothing since. I can't bring myself to remove the nest and eggs yet, as I want to be 200% sure they have been abandoned. My only guess is that one of the parents must have been killed.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 22, 2021, 11:53:21 AM
Gee. That's quite possible. Never had that problem ourselves. Wouldn't even a single parent nurture the nest?   I'd be like you  and not want to remove the eggs too soon.   
I found this for you:
https://www.bing.com/search?q=reasons+a+bluebird+nest+be+abandoned&form=CHRDEF&sp=-1&pq=&sc=0-0&qs=n&sk=&cvid=3D2AEE31E1FB4676A0B312A91511854F (https://www.bing.com/search?q=reasons+a+bluebird+nest+be+abandoned&form=CHRDEF&sp=-1&pq=&sc=0-0&qs=n&sk=&cvid=3D2AEE31E1FB4676A0B312A91511854F)

Also, do you know about  Bluebird Nut.com? I mentioned it in the prologue to this thread and on pg. 1 We refer to it from time to time
http://bluebirdnut.com/ (http://bluebirdnut.com/)

Do keep us posted.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 27, 2021, 12:15:54 PM
I gave it another week. Unfortunately they have clearly been abandoned. Looking back I remember an early evening when the Bluebirds were going crazy in the trees around the yard. Walked out into the yard and scared off a screech owl. Could have been the reason the eggs were abandoned, but just a guess at this point.
Another very helpful website for bluebirders:

http://www.sialis.org/
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 28, 2021, 02:14:58 AM
Hey Raleigh...
sorry that you had to clear out a nest. Yikes, a screech owl. Sometimes a guess is not bad conclusion.
Thanks for the link.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 28, 2021, 02:16:40 AM
Almost forgot...
JIm will check the nesting box around Thursday/Friday  this week.  So maybe then we'll see a pip.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: paulie on July 29, 2021, 12:12:33 PM
VERY interesting topic. Thanks for all the pictures and info posted by Phyl and Raleigheagle. Very cool and informative.

Hi Mp!  :)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 29, 2021, 01:58:54 PM
Phyliz......just curious, is the box where you currently have eggs in the shade? I've seen some folks fashion a shade umbrella for the boxes when they have eggs this late in the season.
Hope you see a pip soon, and a successful hatch.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 30, 2021, 03:05:41 AM
No. There's no shade. They seem to do just fine
Gonna take some pics tomorrow.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 30, 2021, 03:06:20 AM
Hi. Paulie
Thanks.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 30, 2021, 08:18:45 PM
Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
And here they are...
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/86/34/e8/8634e8ea461f0986c1f0c4de11b7e973.jpg)
Welcome to the world, Cane Ridge #49, 50 , 51 and 52 !
The precious guys and gals are out of the shell about 3  days when Jim took the photo this Thursday, 7-29-21.*
Chicks, you'll  have great parents and two humans that love you very much. :-* :-* :-*



* Including the day the photo was taken.

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 30, 2021, 08:18:58 PM
The juvies or teenagers, as I call them, are gone. It is doubtful if we'll see them again. But they were loads of fun while here. Then again...
there's the chance  Mom and Dad remain  with us until / thru the 2022 nesting season. Or they'will leave after this brood fledges and grows up ; a pair from clutch #2 will return and make a life here with us. Either way  ;) :-*


Post Script: Jim reports that he believes he saw clutch 2 teenagers early this morning.   ;D ;D ;D :-* :-* :-*
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 31, 2021, 07:12:57 AM
Congratulations on the successful hatch!! I'm glad your still seeing the juvies from a previous hatch. I had four lined up last evening on the deck next to the mealworm feeder. So much fun to watch. Cant wait to see pictures of your newest four as they grow.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on July 31, 2021, 07:20:55 AM
Caught this little guy before he took off after mom.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on July 31, 2021, 01:28:08 PM
Thanks.  I  will post updates here for sure.
Cute little fella. They're so chubby at that age.  ;D
Have a good weekend with your BBs.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 03, 2021, 06:11:35 PM
Jim is suppose to mow tomorrow. Hopefully, he'll get a couple of snaps of our babies.  :-* :-* :-*
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 01:23:56 AM
All the photos posted were taken 8-5-2021 between 3:08 and 3:30PM.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/b0/b1/7e/b0b17e0d3fd34de04bbf0d0df7d6354d.jpg)
Dad bluebird surveiling deck.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 01:30:19 AM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e2/34/71/e23471df5eeab0c1a9302a26548d92f5.jpg)
Mom bluebird, 3rd clutch
Our pretty lady/devoted mom taking a break from feedings while Dad pulls his shift.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 01:37:15 AM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/71/e3/8c/71e38c16cb65f9e85f2e691b49f9406f.jpg)
Squirrel, dad bluebird, juvenile female cardinal
Dad keeping guard and juvie female cardinal waiting on squirrel to leave, So she can have some peanuts.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 01:43:04 AM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/e6/2a/02/e62a022807383ff740c0618ace947e02.jpg)
Juvenile female cardinal (deck rail, top left) waiting for squirrel to leave the peanut jar.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 01:50:07 AM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/9b/04/df/9b04dfd45252accc4e6ef2a54a0b4ed5.jpg)
Squirrel, mom bluebird and juvenile female cardinal
Squirrel chowing down, mom bluebird keeping guard(perched on feeder pole) and juvenile female cardinal(kiwer left) waiting her turn.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 01:59:57 AM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/8f/02/11/8f021138b98c7585f5ba580df6247278.jpg)
A resident squirrel... striking a pose.

I had been poised for about 30 minutes waiting for some bluebird action.
This gal (?) had been making visiting the peanut feeder.
She inched her way closer to deck door. I shifted and she ran back to stairs. I looked down at her , she sat up, pulled her front legs to her chest. And I got this.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 02:12:48 AM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/52/d4/ae/52d4ae3f9e349f6e793a303eddc6e27c.jpg)
Our four bluebird hatchlings about 13 days out of their eggs.
  Jim snapped this one,8-4-2021,  from the nesting box. Pin feathers visible. Mom and dad busy, busy with feedings. Our avian babies busy growing up ,up and up. Calculations estimate fledging next Sunday or Monday August 14th, 15th respectively. However...our sweet babies could fly the coop on the 13th or 16th.
 Lately this season, my batting average on witnessing the event have been 0/0  !! >:(
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 11, 2021, 10:45:01 AM
I gave it another week. Unfortunately they have clearly been abandoned. Looking back I remember an early evening when the Bluebirds were going crazy in the trees around the yard. Walked out into the yard and scared off a screech owl. Could have been the reason the eggs were abandoned, but just a guess at this point.
Another very helpful website for bluebirders:

http://www.sialis.org/

I checked you link for Sialis.org. Quite extensive and detailed. Will forward to Jim. Many thanks
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Linda M on August 11, 2021, 11:24:00 AM
Sweet photo of hatchlings, Phyl - thanks!  Hope you will see a fledge.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Raleigheagle on August 12, 2021, 06:27:04 AM
Best of luck with the new hatchlings.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 13, 2021, 02:06:33 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/c7/1e/87/c71e87a0d4454e7f7a3399ebd75cbdb5.jpg)
8-12-21 PM
Mom bluebird on feeder pole keeping entertained with the squirrel trio at peanut jar.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 13, 2021, 02:07:01 PM
Hi ladies...hope all's well on  your end.
Right now,  skies very dark and extremely  noisy with gurgling and rumbling. The wind is stirring---the seed feeder pole is wriggling and Mom BB can hardly keep hold---back and forth to the nesting box she's been traveling.. And, here it comes what a down pour!!  First rate T-storm.  Mom/Dad have sought shelter. I've always had a concern about lightening strikes as those nesting boxes have a metal baffle and are screwed onto a slotted metal fence post exactly like used in thse barbbed wire fences for cattle.  Jim will say I fret too much though.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 15, 2021, 04:59:27 PM
Jim thought he 'd be able to take a guarded peek into the nesting box to confirm that our quad have fledge. The T-storms have prohibited us doing such.
However, tomorrow looks promising for this.
I did see Mom and Dad BB raiding the meal worm feeder of the deck. Each snatched a couple of worms up and promptly headed for the woods between the
new construction and Old Hickory Hills. Before I could hold up my iPhone!
Regardless, I'll have at least one photo to post.

It's been a very dreary and wet day here. The only wildlife stirring have been the cardinals feeding on peanut pickouts , a rabbit, and a very early morning chipmunk.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 18, 2021, 04:10:26 PM
I've been having some issues with send my photos from iPhone that's why there's been a delay.

Almost missed the show got a glimps of CR-52(?) pushing off for the williow tree as parents instructed this time. There weren't any more chicks after this one so the avian right of passage was complete. It's been my experience with bluebirds, anyway, that the first hatched usually fledge first. I watch the color development carefully as well to get an inkling as to gender.
Mom & dad  furrently have #s 49-52 in the forest for survival training & flight school.
I'll post photos as the fledglings and parents present themselves for  introductions and a graduation photo.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 18, 2021, 04:13:05 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/0c/55/ac/0c55ac16fc762884bd31c1e96357dac4.jpg)

An empty nest after a fledge 8-14-21 late afternoon.
Jim will be out to clean and sanitize box #1 to ready it for the 2022 nesting season. With only a mimimum of tidying-up come March 2022.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on August 18, 2021, 04:16:24 PM
In the meantime, we have a pair from 2021's first clutch visiting . I think the new adults are two older ones CR 39 & 40, male/female respectively. They visited the mealworm feeder the past two days. Our 2020/21 parents may not stay once #49-52 have been shown the door. Or their senior offspring may take their place. Who knows until it happens.
CR-39 is a carbon copy of his dad with the almost Indigo blue head and shoulders , perhaps with more depth of color. CR40 has just slightly  more vibrant colors then her mom.
I'll post photos as the pair present themselves.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 01, 2021, 02:17:41 PM
Surprizingly with all that IDA dumped on us the last two days. I had a BB sighting late Monday.
This had me all excited and over the moon!
A very rain drenched Dad or Dad Jr.  (CR-39)He appeared much more color intense than when dry...dah! LOL
My iPhone was in reach, I got it and positined myself to shoot---he turned, saw me. And, off he went!  >:(
Confirming that this was Junior from clutch #1  of this season.

Jim's cleaned nesting box #1 and it is officially ready for BBs next season or this winter as some have chosen in the past.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 05, 2021, 04:14:13 PM

Saturday, 9-4-2021, was sunny and I had some time before dinner, so I 'camped out at the deck doors and was happily surprized by a visit by three of our 3rd clutch juvies.
Who have yet to perch themselves on our deck. But will settle for a feeder pole appearance. Not too sure  who is who here since the family took off  while we were busy.
 Even though we make it a habit of glancing out a back window to see what we 'can see'. We managed to miss them.
However!
Finally... I was fast enough on the " shutter"
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/27/ce/f1/27cef13038728f5fc4d0d7ff86ff672b.jpg)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 05, 2021, 04:26:39 PM
Chipmunk, 9-4-2021.
Caught this chubby critter while waiting for the appearance of the 3rd clutch fledglings.
We have several ground squirrels. But, this one has been porking out on the peanut
pickouts.

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/28/d1/65/28d1655778f101859576c75b97e09b9a.jpg)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 06, 2021, 02:48:01 AM
9-4-2021
Dad Jr. , CR- 39( so named, for his almost Indigo blue head and shoulders like his father's), visiting after 3rd clutch fledges and briefly return.
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/f7/da/32/f7da32b5fa2d691f26b2d59e9265b074.jpg)

CR-40, his sister usually flys with him. She was out of camera's 'view', to the right.
Could they be the new 'Mom & Dad' for 2022?


Although, not the customary 'graduation' photo I'm usually able to capture.
This does officially close the 2021 nesting season here in our Cane Ridge backyard.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 06, 2021, 02:55:24 AM
The Bluebirds have hinted  of some 'surprizes' our way for the remainder of 2021. :o
 What could these be?

(https://th.bing.com/th/id/OIP.rtOjmefozBINL77d8VXMhQHaIP?w=154&h=180&c=7&r=0&o=5&pid=1.7)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Linda M on September 06, 2021, 06:38:06 PM
They are so beautiful; congratulations on a great season and thank you for sharing the photos!
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 07, 2021, 06:08:35 PM
Why is the color blue so rare in nature?
By Mindy Weisberger 1 day ago
(https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/rLfsoMWQcn5g5HtpGUkxzT-970-80.jpg)

Feeling blue? That color isn't as common as you may think.
When you look up at the blue sky overhead or gaze across the seemingly endless expanse of a blue ocean, you might think that the color blue is common in nature.

But among all the hues found in rocks, plants and flowers, or in the fur, feathers, scales and skin of animals, blue is surprisingly scarce.

But why is the color blue so rare? The answer stems from the chemistry and physics of how colors are produced — and how we see them.

We're able to see color because each of our eyes contains between 6 million and 7 million light-sensitive cells called cones. There are three different types of cones in the eye of a person with normal color vision, and each cone type is most sensitive to a particular wavelength of light: red, green or blue. Information from millions of cones reaches our brains as electrical signals that communicateWhen we look at a colorful object, such as a sparkling sapphire or a vibrant hydrangea bloom, "the object is absorbing some of the white light that falls onto it; because it's absorbing some of the light, the rest of the light that's reflected has a color," science writer Kai Kupferschmidt, author of "Blue: In Search of Nature's Rarest Color" (The Experiment, 2021), told Live Science. all the types of light reflected by what we see, which is then interpreted as different shades of color.


Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 07, 2021, 06:15:47 PM
Why is the color blue so rare in nature?, continued

"When you see a blue flower — for instance, a cornflower — you see the cornflower as blue because it absorbs the red part of the spectrum," Kupferschmidt said. Or to put it another way, the flower appears blue because that color is the part of the spectrum that the blossom rejected, Kupferschmidt wrote in his book, which explores the science and nature of this popular hue.
(https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/mJpxubCdQyJ6bCGmWJYLkT-970-80.jpg)
In the book "Blue," writer Kai Kupferschmidt explores the science behind this elusive color. (Image credit: Courtesy of The Experiment)

In the visible spectrum, red has long wavelengths, meaning it is very low-energy compared with other colors. For a flower to appear blue, "it needs to be able to produce a molecule that can absorb very small amounts of energy," in order to absorb the red part of the spectrum, Kupferschmidt said.
Generating such molecules — which are large and complex — is difficult for plants to do, which is why blue flowers are produced by fewer than 10% of the world's nearly 300,000 flowering plant species. One possible driver for the evolution of blue flowers is that blue is highly visible to pollinators such as bees, and producing blue blossoms may benefit plants in ecosystems where competition for pollinators is high, Adrian Dyer, an associate professor and vision scientist at the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Australia, told the Australian Broadcasting Company in 2016.

As for minerals, their crystal structures interact with ions (charged atoms or molecules) to determine which parts of the spectrum are absorbed and which are reflected. The mineral lapis lazuli, which is mined primarily in Afghanistan and produces the rare blue pigment ultramarine, contains trisulfide ions — three sulfur atoms bound together inside a crystal lattice — that can release or bind a single electron.

"That energy difference is what makes the blue," Kupferschmidt said.
(https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/x9JYXYdsaA3nqGUuwcfd4c-970-80.jpg)
Azurite is a copper carbonate hydroxide mineral known for its deep-blue color. (Image credit: Serge Briez/capmediations/Getty Images)

Blue animals' colors don't come from chemical pigments. Rather, they rely on physics to create a blue appearance. Blue-winged butterflies in the Morpho genus have intricate, layered nanostructures on their wing scales that manipulate layers of light so that some colors cancel each other out and only blue is reflected; a similar effect happens in structures found in the feathers of blue jays (Cyanocitta cristata), the scales of blue tangs (Paracanthurus hepatus) and the flashing rings of venomous blue-ringed octopuses (Hapalochlaena maculosa).





Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 07, 2021, 06:21:24 PM
Why is the color blue so rare in nature?, continued

Blue shades in mammals are even rarer than in birds, fish, reptiles and insects. Some whales and dolphins have bluish skin; primates such as golden snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus roxellana) have blue-skinned faces; and mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) have blue faces and blue rear ends. But fur — a trait shared by most terrestrial mammals — is never naturally bright blue (at least, not in visible light. Researchers recently found that platypus fur glows in vivid shades of blue and green when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) rays, Live Science previously reported). 
"But it takes a lot of work to make this blue, and so the other question becomes: What are the evolutionary reasons to make blue? What's the incentive?" Kupferschmidt said. "The fascinating thing when you dive into these animal worlds is always, who's the recipient of this message and can they see the blue?"

For example, while humans have three light-sensing receptor types in our eyes, birds have a fourth receptor type for sensing UV light. Feathers that appear blue to human eyes "actually reflect even more UV light than blue light," Kupferschmidt explained. By that reasoning, the birds that we call blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) "would probably call themselves 'UV tits,' because that's what they would mostly see," he said.
Because of blue's scarcity in nature, the word for blue was a relative latecomer to languages around the world, appearing after the words for black, white, red and yellow, according to Kupferschmidt.

"One theory for this is that you really only need to name a color once you can dye things — once you can divorce the color from its object. Otherwise, you don't really need the name for the color," he explained. "Dyeing things blue or finding a blue pigment happened really late in most cultures, and you can see that in the linguistics."
(https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/rLfsoMWQcn5g5HtpGUkxzT-970-80.jpg)
Birds' brilliant blue plumage, such as that of Spix's macaws (Cyanopsitta spixii), gets its color not from pigments but from structures in feathers that scatter light. (Image credit: Wera Rodsawang/Getty Images)

The earliest use of blue dye dates to about 6,000 years ago in Peru, and the ancient Egyptians combined silica, calcium oxide and copper oxide to create a long-lasting blue pigment known as irtyu for decorating statues, researchers reported Jan. 15 in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science. Ultramarine, a vivid blue pigment ground from lapis lazuli, was as precious as gold in medieval Europe, and was reserved primarily for illustrating illuminated manuscripts.

Blue's rarity meant that people viewed it as a high-status color for thousands of years. Blue has long been associated with the Hindu deity Krishna and with the Christian Virgin Mary, and artists who were famously inspired by blue in nature include Michelangelo, Gauguin, Picasso and Van Gogh, according to the Frontiers in Plant Science study.

"The relative scarcity of blue available in natural pigments likely fueled our fascination," the scientists wrote.

Blue also colors our expressions, appearing in dozens of English idioms: You can work a blue-collar job, swear a blue streak, sink into a blue funk or talk until you're blue in the face, to name just a few. And blue can sometimes mean contradictory things depending on the idiom: "'Blue sky ahead' means a bright future, but 'feeling blue' is being sad," Kupferschmidt said.

Blue’s scarcity in nature may have helped shape our perception of the color and things that appear blue. "With blue, it's like a whole canvas that you can still paint on," Kupferschmidt said. "Maybe because it is rare in nature and maybe because we associate it with things that we can't really touch, like the sky and the sea, it's something that is very open to different associations."

Editor's note: The article was updated Sept. 7 to reflect that lapis lazuli is mined in locations other than Afghanistan, though Afghanistan is the main source of the mineral.

Originally published on Live Science.

Mindy Weisberger

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 10, 2021, 06:56:59 PM
From the archives of  The Cane Ridge Bluebirds

We hadn't been bluebirding but a few years when we decided to document our resident blue avians.
 I was still using my Cannon camera in 2011 when we started to photograph the nest activity. Everything I photographed was printed on paper from the usual
negatives (which I stll have, somewhere  :-\).
Jim was still flying corporate aircraft for a private lable pet food manufacture. He was gone, alot untill 2010.
It wasn't until  2012 that I upgraded to digital Nikon camera. Later, I found using my smart phone to take the bluebird snaps more convient and easier to transfer to my desktop
computer.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 10, 2021, 06:57:08 PM
Highlights from the 2016 nesting season.
 The blue avians were faithful to their  natural 'timetable'.   Keeping tabs on our BBs was a learned discipline.
We missed a few events.  :'(

(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/d0/62/11/d06211457315307f50dd6f2b06d0f5fd.jpg)
Taken 5-2-2016
The egglets will be,  Cane Ridge  21, 22, 23 and 24 !
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 10, 2021, 06:57:20 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/72/4f/d3/724fd356ccc7f37028603131c92bc6d5.jpg)
Taken  5-18-2016
Welcome to the World CR-21, 22, and 23!
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 10, 2021, 07:03:19 PM
(https://i.pinimg.com/564x/58/25/2e/58252efa5d63f73e0792013a6dd1a1eb.jpg)
Taken 5-24-2016

Now we have CR-24.
The kids are all present and accounted .
Mom and dad were busy that season as new parents. The grandchildren of the original 'Mom and Dad Bluebird'
We soon learned the the parents usually stayed two or three seasons and left. With a pair from a previous season returning to make
their home with us.
However, there was a pair that stayed with us  year 'round for several years.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:12:44 AM
The Bluebird Menu:

These cheery song birds usually eat grasshopper, beetles, spiders, crickets, and caterpillars.
And, a few side dishes like, flies, ants, wasps, moths, weevils. And, to the delight of homeowners---termites!

We’ve found spying with our binoculars, that during nesting season the amount of collected insects collect is much higher than some experts report.   The hatch-lings need lots and lots of protine  and this is the best source for our sweet babies.
Food is usually spotted from our ribbon elms, willow and redbud trees all within a few feet or Nesting Box #1 and #2. Our BBs are often seen in our front yard  pricking the lawn . There have been several occasions in earlier seasons with fledglings educating them in how to hunt and forage.
Upon a rare occasion, I’ve seen them catch insects in mid-air  as is the true fashion of tree swallows.

Some statistics* for feeding nestlings are:
 caterpillars-32.4%
grasshoppers-25.6%
spiders- 11.3%
Sometimes earthworms are fed to older hatch-lings. But I have read  that this can cause a bad case of  diarrhea
* Sialis.org
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:12:54 AM
The remainder of our BBs diet consists of small fruit from native shrubs  like our  Common Privet, English Ivy (Hedera helix) in our deck rail planters,  and Persian Lilac.  We have noted that a wider selection needs to be provided and plan to plant a few more next spring. Keeping fingers crossed that the economy improves...alot!
They also eat, flowering dogwood, holly, mulberry, wild grape, pokeweed, Virginia creeper and Viburnum. Either picked right from the plant or from the ground below.

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:13:10 AM
Here’s a full list what to plant for our charming Eastern Bluebirds as provided by Sialis.org
It is noteworth to mention that multiflora rose, is a highly invasive plant and should not ever be planted.

Autumn Olive - see Elaeagnus
    • Barberry, especially Japanese (Berberis thunbergii), also European (Berberis vulgaris)
    • Bradford/Callery Pear - Pyrus calleryana - recent cultivars bred to reduce splitting are not sterile and are invading distrubed areas in the eastern U.S.
    • Cherry Silverberry - - see Elaeagnus
    • Chinaberry/Umbrella Tree/Persian Lilac (Melia azedarach L.)
    • Chinese Tallow Tree (Sapium sebiferum or Triadica sebifera)
    • Common Privet (Ligustrum vulgare) and Japanese (L. japonicum)
    • Cotoneasters - some like Franchet (Cotoneaster franchetti) and silverleaf (Cotoneaster pannosa)
    • Dwarf Mistletoe (Arceuthobium spp.)
    • Elaeagnus: Russian Olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), Autumn Olive (E. umbellata), Cherry Silverberry (E. multiflora), Thorny Elaeagnus (E. pungens)
    • English or Cherry Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus)
    • English Ivy (Hedera helix)
    • Honeysuckles (11 species listed in some states) especially Japanese Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), also Tatarian Honeysuckle (Lonicera tatarica)
    • Leatherlef Mahonia (Mahoni bealei)
Morrow Honeysuckle (Lonicera morrowii) and their hybrids
    • Multiflora Rose (Rosa multiflora Thunbergi)
    • Porcelain Berry (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata (Maxim)
    • Russian Olive - see Elaeagnus
    • Oriental/Asiatic Bittersweet (Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb.) - bright orange berries along the length of stems - American Bittersweet is not invasive
    • Thorny Elaegnus see Elaeagnus
    • White (wild) mulberry (Morus alba) - white berries

(http://www.sialis.org/images/463675372_Lvuf7-Osm.jpg)
(http://www.sialis.org/images/bluebird-and-berries-2.jpg)

Above: Western bluebirds eating Tonyon berries. Photo by Leslie McCulloch of California.
Below: Eastern bluebird fledgling eating Pokeweed. photo by Dave Kinneer of Virginia.

(http://www.sialis.org/images/101978117_hyUfH5sjpokeb.jpg)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:15:12 AM
“The best thing you can do to help bluebirds have a healthy, varied diet is to landscape with native plants that produce berries throughout the seasons, and avoid using pesticides (which kill insects and can harm or kill birds), and place nestboxes in the right habitat for hunting. Eastern bluebirds prefer semi-open grassland habitat, such as mowed meadows, large lawns, cemeteries, orchards, roadsides, and areas with scattered trees and short ground cover. Areas with fence lines, some medium size trees, or telephone lines provide perches for hunting and nest-guarding. Western Bluebirds tend not to favor large, open meadows.”
 From Sialis.org
    • Guinan, Judith A., Patricia A. Gowaty and Elsie K. Eltzroth. 2008. Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana), The Birds of North America Online (A. Poole, Ed.). Ithaca: Cornell Lab of Ornithology; Retrieved from the Birds of North America Online: http://bna.birds.cornell.edu/bna/species/510 doi:10.2173/bna.510
    • For those who want to reduce the use of pesticides, starting a bluebird trail in agricultural areas like vineyards can be a great addition to an Integrated Pest Management Plan (which minimizes the use of chemicals and relies more on natural alternatives.)

    • Migratory Bird Treaty Act - This law did not go into effect until 1918. It prohibits collection of native birds without a permit.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:33:31 AM
A selection of Books on Bluebirds and bluebirding

Attracting Bluebirds and Other Cavity Nesting Songbirds in North Dakota: A Guide to Establishing, Monitoring and Maintaining Nestbox Trails
Chris Grondahl
1999
16 pp Pamphlet

Audubon Birdhouse Book: Building, Placing, and Maintaining Great Homes for Great Birds
Margaret Barker & Elissa Wolfson
2013
160 pp guide
Beakless Bluebirds and Featherless Penguins

Sister Barbara Ann
1990
274 pp Novel
ISBN 1878919059

Bluebird Book, The Complete Guide to Attracting Bluebirds
Donald and Lillian Stokes
1991
96 pp guide
ISBN 0316817457

The Bluebird, How You Can Help Its Fight for Survival
Larry Zeleny
1976, 1978
170 pp
ISBN 0253202124

The Bluebird Monitor's Guide

Cynthia Berger, Keith Kridler, Jack Griggs
2001
128 pp
ISBN 0062737430

Bluebirds!
Steve Grooms, Dick Peterson
1991
159 pp
ISBN 1559710950


Bluebirds and Their Survival

Wayne H. Davis, Philippe Roca
1995
154 pp guide
ISBN 0813108462

Bluebirds Forever
Connie Toops
1994, 1997
143 pp
ISBN 0896582493

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:38:42 AM
A selection of Books on Bluebirds and bluebirding, continued

Bluebirds in My House, Bonnie and Ben
Arnette Heidcamp
1997
150 pp
Hardcover
ISBN 051770497X?

Bluebirds
Their Daily Lives and How to Attract and Raise Bluebirds
Tina and Curtis Dew, and R.B. (Reber) Layton
1986
212 pp
ISBN 0912542063

Bluebird Trails
A Guide to Success

Edited by Dorene Scriven
1999 (3rd edition)
210 pp guide
ISBN 0963966111

Bluebird Trails in the Upper Midwest: A guide to successful trail management
Dorene Scriven
1989
178 pp

Bring Back the Bluebirds, Even to Your Hand
Andy Troyer
1994
32 pp booklet
ISBN 0964254840

Build a Bluebird Trail
Dale Evva Gelfand
1999
32 ppbooklet
1580172342

Captivating Bluebirds
Stan Tekila
2008
144 pp
ISBN 1591930731

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:42:40 AM
A selection of Books on Bluebirds and bluebirding, continued

Eastern Bluebird
Gary Ritchison
2000
119 pp
ISBN 0811727459

Enjoying Bluebirds More
Julie Zickefoose
1993, 1999?
32 pp
ISBN 188024103X

Enjoying Bluebirds More

Julie Zickefoose
1993, 1999?
32 pp pamphlet
ISBN 188024103X

How to Control House Sparrows
Don Grussing
1980, 2000
51 pp booklet
No ISBN


I Hear Bluebirds
Shirl Brunnel
149 pp
ISBN 0913425168

Life Histories of North American Thrushes, Kinglets and Their Alliesez
Arthur C. Bent
1949
452 pp
ISBN 0486210863
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:44:18 AM
Mountain Bluebird Trail Monitoring Guide
Myrna Pearman
2002
56 pages
ISBN 0-9685765-2-4

The Return of the Bluebird
Andre P. Dion
1981

Studying Eastern Bluebirds: A Biologist’s Report and Reflections
Dr. David Pitts
2011, self-published
ISBN: 0615411339

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:54:39 AM
A selection of Bluebird books for Children

A Nest of Bluebirds
Rose Marie Botts Scott
64 pp
ISBN 1888683414   very young children

All About Bluebirds
E.P. "Perk Floyd
1987
16 pp
ISBN 0941699005

Bluebird Rescue
Joan Rattner Heilman
1982
48 pp
ISBN 0688008941

Bluebird Summer
Deborah Hopkinson
2001
32 pp
ISBN 0688173993 

Bluebird Rescue
Joan Rattner Heilman
1982
48 pp
ISBN 0688008941   Grades 9-12


Bluebird Summer
Deborah Hopkinson
2001
32 pp
ISBN 0688173993  Grades 4-8

Blue Sky Bluebird
Rich Chrustowski
2004
32 pp
ISBN 0805071040   Grades 9-12

Children's Bluebird Activity Book
Mountain Bluebird Trails
Myrna Pearman and Pauline Mousseau
2009
52 pages
http://www.mountainbluebirdtrails.com/book.htm (http://www.mountainbluebirdtrails.com/book.htm)
(http://www.mountainbluebirdtrails.com/images/image002.jpg)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 01:59:22 AM
A selection of Bluebird books for Children, continued

Helping Billy Bluebird
Mary Ellen Caruso
reprinted in 2007
24 pages
ISBN 1419664999 or 978-1419664991  Ages  4-8

The Mountain Bluebird
Ron Hirschi
48 pp
ISBN 0525650105    Ages 9-12

What Bluebirds Do
Pamela Kirby

Young Birder's Guide
Bill Thompson III (author), Julie Zickefoose (illustrator)
256 pages
ISBN 978-0547119342 or 0547119348

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 02:04:11 AM
Some Magazines for birding

Birdwatcher's Digest
Monthly magazine
A publication for bird watchers in America. It includes articles, ID cues, tips for creating better bird habitat, and stories about personal encounters with birds.
 (It does not focus on cavity nesters)


Birds and Blooms
 
Bluebird
North American Bluebird Society quarterly journal
An edited journal with photos and articles (both technical and conversational) on small-cavity nesters, focusing on bluebirds.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 02:08:33 AM
A Selection of  General Birding Books that are useful to Bluebirders

The Audubon Society Encyclopedia of North American Birds
Terres, John K.
1980
Alfred A. Knopf Inc., New York, New York. 1,109 pp.


The Backyard Birdhouse Book
Rene and Christyna Laubach
1999
216 pp
ISBN 1580171044


Birdhouse Book
Building Houses, Feeders, and Baths
Don McNeil
110 pp
ISBN 0914718363

Birds in Nestboxes, How to help, study, and enjoy birds when snags are scarce.
Charlotte C. Cockran
143 pp
ISBN 0879612703

Birds of North America
Chandler S. Robbins, Bertel Bruun, Herbert S. Zim, Arthur Singer
2001
360 pp
ISBN 1582380902


The Birder's Handbook A Field Guide to the Natural History of North American Birds
Paul R. Ehrlich, David S. Dobkin, and Darryl Wheye
1988
720 pp
ISBN: 0671659898
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 02:10:57 AM
A Selection of  General Birding Books that are useful to Bluebirders

Birds Eggs
Michael Walters, Mark B. Robbins, Harry Taylor 1994
256 pp
ISBN: 1564581756

Birdwatcher
The Life of Roger Tory Peterson
Elizabeth J. Rosenthal
www.petersonbird.com
2008
464 pp
ISBN: 1599212943

Black-capped Chickadee
Gary Ritchison
1999
96 pp
ISBN:



 
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 02:15:22 AM
A Selection of  General Birding Books that are useful to Bluebirders ,   continued


Downy Woodpecker
Gary Ritchison
1999
96 pp
ISBN: 0811727246

Enhancing Your Backyard for Wildlife
Peter M. Picone
27 pp

A Field Guide to the Birds: A Completely New Guide to All the Birds of Eastern and Central North America
Roger Tory Peterson
1998
384 pp
ISBN 0395911761
Peterson Field Guide Series


A Field Guide to the Birds' Nests: United States east of the Mississippi River
Hal H. Harrison, Mada Harrison, Ned Smith, Roger Tory Peterson
1975, expanded edition 1998
288 pp
ISBN 0395936098
Peterson Field Guide Series



A field guide to the nests, eggs, and nestlings of North American birds
Colin James, Oliver Harrison
1978
416 pp
ISBN 0529054841

A Field Guide to Western Birds' Nests
Hal H. Harrison, Mada Harrison, Roger Tory Peterson
1997, 2001
384 pp
ISBN 0618164375
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 16, 2021, 02:26:34 AM
A Selection of  General Birding Books that are useful to Bluebirders ,   continued

The Grail Bird
Tim Gallagher
2005
288 pp
ISBN 0618456938

A Guide to the Nests, Eggs, and Nestlings of North American Birds
Paul J. Baicich, J. O. Harrison
1997 (2nd ed.)
350 pp
ISBN 0120728311

Home Study Course in Bird Biology
Introductory college level, suitable for people with a serious interest in birds.
Subjects include  Bird behavior, migration, ecology, conservation course. Text written by ornithologists.

The Sibley Guide to Birds
David Allen Sibley
2000
544 pp
ISBN: 0679451226


The Sibley Guide to Bird Life & Behavior
David Allen Sibley
2001
608 pp
ISBN: 0679451234

   
 
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 17, 2021, 01:03:45 PM
For those who are really love bluebirds,  in my search for BB wear and such, I found  some tasteful items on RedBubble.com

https://www.redbubble.com/shop/bluebirds (https://www.redbubble.com/shop/bluebirds)

I also did a general search.
https://www.bing.com/search?q=bluebird+merchandise+for+enthusiast&qs=NW&pq=bluebird+merchandise+for+enthu&sk=NW1&sc=2-30&cvid=972A0272556B43E1A1EC3A714A4934BF&FORM=QBRE&sp=2 (https://www.bing.com/search?q=bluebird+merchandise+for+enthusiast&qs=NW&pq=bluebird+merchandise+for+enthu&sk=NW1&sc=2-30&cvid=972A0272556B43E1A1EC3A714A4934BF&FORM=QBRE&sp=2)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 19, 2021, 07:41:11 PM
This morning,  during our non-stop rain here in Cane Ridge, Tennessee, while standing at the deck doors  I looked up from my earl morning coffee.
And, behold!
A pair of BB's perched a top the feeder pole. I was surprized to say the very least.  I just stood there, wide-eyed staring making sure  of the view and this
wasn't wishful thinking. Nope it was a pair of females. By the time I turned to cross over to the dinning table  to fetch my iPhone. I turned back--- the gals had flown off to the williow tree
at the bottom of the yard. Too far for a good photo at least not with this device.

I'm convienced the BBs returned to check out the meal worm feeder they had known from their fledgling days.
 But, Jim had it on the wicker table infront of the chairs. It had been airing a few days earlier
 from a disinfecting. He had only taken time to close it before the rains started early last Monday AM before he left for work.
. No decent break in weather. There it has remained.
Further research has revealed that the worms we had been purchaseing are now harvested and processed in China!  Bluebirders, all birders, know what this means.
So we're investagating who locally we can purchase meal worms raised and processed in the good 'ol US of A.
More to follow...
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 01:52:34 AM
BLUEBIRD VIDEOS
list from Sialis.org

Backyard Blues, 1991. Fledglings feed at kitchen window and bathe. Bluebird orphans, etc. Birdseye View Productions. 48 minutes.

Bluebird Basics, Getting Started with Bluebirds, by Don and Lillian Stokes. Useful for presentations to schools or workshops. Covers all three species; habitat; choosing the right bluebird nestbox; monitoring; dealing with competitors and predators; starting a bluebird trail; the importance of keeping records and research; etc.

Bluebirds Inside the Nestbox, by the North Carolina Bluebird Society. From actual nestbox cam footage. Interesting, fun for children (not much explanatory dialog.) May be purchased online directly from The North Carolina Bluebird Society as a VHS tape or a DVD for $13.85, including shipping; quantity discounts are available. 15 minutes.

Bluebirds Up Close, by Nature Science Network, Inc. 1990. Photography and sound recordings; tips on building, placing, and maintaining nestboxes; and guarding against predators, feeders, etc. Some mediocre footage. All ages except very young. 50 minutes. Available used from null: Bluebirds Up Close Nature Science Network/Audubon Society, 108 High Street, Carraboro NC 27510.

Bluebird Trails: How to Start and Maintain a Bluebird Trail. 1989. Steps in managing a bluebird trail, practical tips on how to deal with problems such as predators and competitors. Birdseye View Productions. 37 minutes.

Bluebirds in the Suburbs by DG Pearse. $24 (includes shipping). Lengthy, no narrative or music, only the sounds inside the nestbox, with a guidebook of explanations. DG Pearse, 4497 Woodstream Drive Columbus, OH 43230-5128 (614) 478 5004

Jewels of Blue: the Story of the Eastern Bluebird. 1988. Courtship, nesting, and care of young, story of bluebird conservation. Birdseye View Productions, 1761 Country Road H, Deer Park, Wisconsin 54007 (715) 248-7459. 30 minutes.

A Sam's Guide to Bluebirds. DVD+CD. Guide to managing bluebird house or trail, with species profiles, selecting a bluebird box, mounting and predator control, care and management, making your own bluebird box, photos and video of each species, plus 35 minute video by Helen Johnson on Mountain Bluebirds. Retail 24.95 Available to TBS members and Anything Bluebirds.

*Sialis.org
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 01:56:36 AM
*Here is a list of 'some' suppliers:

Ant deterrent (Tanglefoot)
Forestry Suppliers, Inc. 1-800-647-5368, Tree Tanglefoot Pest Barrier Item # 79099 Quantity: 5 pound tub (a small plastic bucket) Cost: $24.95 plus shipping.
Snow Pond Farm Supply (under Traps & Lures or Animal Control)
Biocontrol Network (under Products, Traps & Lures, arrow down to name)

Birdbaths and birdbath heaters
Backyard Birds & Discovery Center
BestNest.com
Bluebird Nut
Duncraft.com
Wildlife Habitat Store
Don't forget to check out local suppliers

Books
See my earlier posts #s 75-85 this thread

Diatomaceous earth for mites
Food grade diatomaceous earth - buy at a garden or feed/farm store.

Feeders
Birds-I-View - by Steve Garr, large flat roof and interior (9.25x9.5"), wire sides, velcro-ed dish that allows sifting out of mealworm bedding. Also sell a plexiglas sided feeder with roof and floor made of recycled plastic. Both are starling-proof.
Bluebird Nut - vinyl coated wire cages with removable cups, roof, designed for bluebirds (mealworms or suet), fast shipping. Starling proof, Mockingbird resistant. Designed to hang. Also Van Ert Luring Feeder.

Duncraft.com - Cage within a cage wire feeder with roof and floor. Good for suet cakes, easy to refill (roof lifts). Mealworms will escape.
Nestbox Builder - Fred Stille makes the mealworm feeder designed by Steve Gilbertson. He also makes HIGH QUALITY nestboxes.

Wild Birds Forever - including Droll Yankee X-1 "seed-saver" feeder (not starling proof)
Wildlife Habitat Store
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 01:59:52 AM
... a list of 'some' suppliers, continued

Hole Reducers ("Squirrel Tooth Benders")
("Squirrel Tooth Benders" are not a trap. To prevent HOSP entry, use smaller than 1.25")
DIY solution: put metal tacks around edge of hole.

The Bird Watcher's General Store (under "birdhouses")
Bluebird Nut - also carries Peterson oval hole guards.
Erva.com - (Nature House) round, metal
Call Wild Bird Crossing at 508 347-BIRD
Wild Bird Habitat Store
Wild Birds Unlimited (request reduced price for bulk order) "doesn't appear to  be available through their website'
1.5" sizes from:
A Bird's Home
Anything Bluebirds
Homes for Bluebirds (copper)

HOSP Deterrent - House Sparrow, Magic Halo
Sparrow Free Magic Halo Repeller. Bird-X used to make them, and Wild Bird Habitat stores and Amazon carried them, but nobody seems to have them anymore. You would have to make your own - see http://www.sialis.org/halo.htm

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 02:01:49 AM
... a list of 'some' suppliers, continued

Nestboxes and accessories
List NABS approved boxes here. See info on nestbox styles pros and cons. NOTE THAT BOXES THAT DO NOT OPEN FOR MONITORING ARE NOT RECOMMENDED!
Check first with a state or local bluebird society. Wildlife-related non-profit organizations may offer basic NABS-style boxes as low as the $5-8 to $25 price range. Some organizations may also offer volume discounts. Sales from bluebird societies help bluebirds!


Ahlgren Construction Company - Original Peterson style. Sadly, Dave Ahlgren passed away in 2007 and his boxes are no longer available.
Andrew Troyer's: The Bird's Paradise, 20835 Morris Road, Conneautville, PA 16406
(800) 872-0103
Backyard Bird Lover: Gilbertson nestbox (made by Merlin Lehman 574-825-8739 then #1, sold through Amazon)
Best Nest - search for "Rubicon" to see boxes made of recycled plastic - supposedly will last 100 years.
Birdhouse Chick - in Georgia. Bluebird houses, feeders, and bird baths, leaf misters. Also live worms limited to certain areas. Overnight shipping for $9.95 for some areas. Note: Boxes that do not open for monitoring are NOT recommended by NABS.
Birding Depot - note: sells open top "Bauldry" boxes no longer recommended by NABS.
Birds-I-View: small business also has gifts, great little chickadee boxes.
Bluebird Nut - Audubon, Rubicon, Coveside, Gilbertson, Gilwood, etc.
Bluebird Housing - rustic log houses with removable roofs
Bluebirds Across Nebraska - very reasonably priced, well made modified Gilbertson and Troyer boxes. Great quality, reasonably priced Gilwood box with a neat rubber hinge at the bottom of the door.
Joe Finn Boxes: boxes with ventilation, predator protection and sparrow traps, etc. (617) 876-9168
Bluebird Society of Pennsylvania - very reasonable prices and sales help bluebirds. They sell Troyer and Gilbertson boxes. I have gotten starlings in their Troyer, and found it hard to set VanErt traps in them.
Duncraft.com
Forschner bit - source of 1 9/16" for making larger entrance holes on your own boxes.
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 12:24:29 PM
... a list of 'some' suppliers, continued
Nestboxes and accessories, continued

Gilbertson (and traps): Steve Gibertson no longer manufactures bluebird products. You can buy a Gilbertson PVC box sometimes at Amazon: buy Gilbertson PVC or get them from BRAW.
Homes for Bluebirds, Inc. Nice looking boxes by Jack Finch. Fax/mail in order (can't order online.) Comes with metal hole guard. Made of solid wood; roof covered with aluminuml for durability.
Kentucky Four Seasons Bluebird Nestboxes - Bill Freels, (270) 443-7985, w.freels"at"worldnet.att.net, cooperating wtih Jackson Purchase Audubon Society. Profits donated to Jackon Purchase. $20.00. Solid construction, innovative bowed fiberglass roof, adjustable plexiglass vent covers.
Ned's Nesting Boxes - handbuilt by a charter member of the Missouri Bluebird Society - nice quality, screws, large overhanging roofs, kerfs, comes with information sheet. Gilbertson boxes also available. 630.269.8267
Nestbox Builder - Fred Stille makes HIGH QUALITY standard NABS style boxes, X-boxes and a Gilwoods, and custom designs.
New York Bluebird Society - click on "for sale" link. Herman Bressler white pine bluebird nestbox (slightly larger than standard NABS box), oval or round hole.
North American Bluebird Society - not currently selling boxes. See other local bluebird societies listed here.
Peterson boxes: Bill Moore [email protected] (612) 280-8655; cell (651) 439-6158; address 12990 Otchipwe Ave North Stillwater MN 55082. He makes boxes like Dave Ahlgren (his neighbor) did, but with the rough edges smoothed down.
The Woodpecker - Gregory Seaford, 5380 Goodman Lake Rd, Salisbury, NC 28146, (704) 636-6238, ghseaford"at"carolina.rr.com (replace "@" with "at"). Southern yellow pine NABS style boxes. Nice to deal with, fast shipment (no hidden charges), willing to work with you want, will paint/stain. Also available on e-Bay.
Southern California Bluebird Club - hanging boxes $15 plus shipping and Purvis lifters
Troyer boxes - great price from Bluebirds Across Nebraska. These boxes are not preferred by House Sparrows.
Wild Bird Habitat Store
Wild Birds Unlimited - also offers pole with brace
Wild Wing Co.: various nestboxes and live traps
Woodstock CT: Teri Stohlberg, 860-481-9003, Audubon Society standard with hole guard and 1.5" round hole,

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 12:25:02 PM
... a list of 'some' suppliers, continued
Nestbox Cams
Birding Depot - Birdhouse Spy Cams under birdhouse accessories
The BirdShed.Com - Birdhouse Spy Cams, cable, computer connection, etc. 110% low price guarantee, but shipping on my first order was not fast, regular price on Hawkeye is not the lowest out there
Harborfreight.com - weatherproof security camera with night vision
Sams Club - Wisecom Color Infrared - cheap
Shaw Creek Bird Supply - color and black and white cams, also pre-installed in nestboxes.
Spyonabird used to sell solar/battery set ups, pre-installed in a box, but they closed in 2018.
Supercircuits - focus is on expensive security systems and wireless. Also have 110% low price guarantee. Website search function rots. Make sure you get an exterior cam.
The Bluebird Nut - Hawkeye and Wingscapes
TV Celeb-Birdies - Birdhouse Spy Cams
Windy City Parrot - Night Owl Night Vision cameras and accessories
Call Dave at (800) 764-8688. Decent set-up for less than $100 with a 50' wire that supplies power and transmits the signal back to a TV or computer. May not be infrared. (This info is from a Bluebird_L post)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 12:26:44 PM
... a list of 'some' suppliers, continued

Mealworms
See 'Suppliers' post
Predator Baffles
See Suppliers

Solar Screen
SparrowTraps.net - ready made, adjustable, weather resistant. Additional mounts and rolls of mylar available.
Mylar: You can use Happy Birthday signs available at card shops/party stores, or buy "bird scare tape" from places like SparrowTraps.net or nursery supply houses.
Sparrow Chaser made by Gene Wasserman, sold through the Michigan Bluebird Society. Easy to install - I am testing them now. Mounts on the back of the box/roof edge, uses bird scare tape that attaches to a wire circle above the roof.
Sparrow Shield made by Gene Wasserman, sold through the Michigan Bluebird Society. Easy to install - I am testing them now. Mounts on the back of the box/roof edge, uses thick flourescent wire. Intended to function like a Magic Halo, which was developed to keep HOSP away from bird feeders.
Sparrow Spookers
See more extensive list of suppliers under HOSP Management. See Trap Review by Paula Z.

Suet
Avian Cuisine is a commercially available formulated wild bird diet. It is available as crumbles, logs, and blocks in three flavors. I have not tried it, but Felicia Lovelett of the MD Bluebird Society recommended it. http://www.natureskeepers.com/our_products.html
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 12:27:37 PM
... a list of 'some' suppliers, continued

Traps - House Sparrow or starling
NESTBOX (Inbox) TRAPS (Also see DIY links) -
Bauldry Trap - sources?
Bolt Trap: Order directly from Mel Bolt (Traps) at 1515 Crosswind Ct. Wooster, OH 44691. You can email him for information at mellen"at"sssnet.com (replace "at" with @).
Gilbertson Trap - BackyardBirdlover or PCMA
Homes for Bluebirds - Jack Finch
Peterson Trap - Ahlgren Construction Company 12989 Otchipwe Ave. N Stillwater, MN 55082 (651)430-0031
PMCA Insert Trap - Huber style, does NOT fit in all style nestboxes
Purple Martin house insert traps - other styles
Van Ert Traps - Floyd Van Ert - universal, PVC, urban (nestbox with trap installed).
GROUND TRAPS
Bird-B-Gone repeating trap - I have not tested this one.
Brad Biddle's trap with no moving parts. Nicely constructed, large door. Contact: yard1man"at"charter.net. NO LONGER MADE.
Cedar Valley Ground Trap is no longer available - Afton Cedar Works (run by Phil Leuthe) is closed.
Deluxe Repeating Sparrow Trap (DRST) by Blaine Johnson. Elevator trap, practically escape-proof. My personal favorite. $59.95 plus shipping based on location.
Bruce Jenkins trap. Formerly sold on eBay - no longer available?
Kness funnel trap - retails for about $60.
ST-1 - Purple Martin Conservation Association
PMCA Repeating Bait Trap - Purple Martin Conservation Association
Wire Sparrow Trap - Purple Martin Conservation Association
Troyer V-Top Trap Plans

Videos
See my post #88


Window clings

See 'Gifts' earlier in this list

Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 20, 2021, 12:31:13 PM
... a list of 'some' suppliers, continued
Gifts - also see Nature Related Gift Ideas
Of course a bird bath, or nestbox with a good basic bluebird book also make excellent presents. Also see a list of nature-related gift suggestions.

Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah Disney's Sing-A-Long Songs
Animal Den - labels, ornaments, coasters, flags, jewely, plush toy, puppets, sign, clothing, etc.
Bank Checks - Backyard Birds (also address labels) at www.checkgallery.com
Birds-I-View: small business owned by bluebirders with a lovely selection of gifts
Bluebird finger puppet Folkmanis Mini Bluebird Finger Puppet
Bluebird Key Chain - Wild Republic Eastern Bluebird Plush Clip, Stuffed Animal, Bird Toys for Kids, Birders, 4"
Bluebird Nut - jewelry, home decor, Mad Bluebird items, prints, cards, calendars, collectibles, etc. Bluebird Gift Shop - clothing, pictures, calendars, cards
Books - bluebirds, general birding, children's bluebird books
Bookmark - bluebird notecards. Bookmark, P.O.Box 335, Delafield, WI 53018 (414) 646-4499
Eastern Bluebird II, 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle Made by BuffaloBuffalo games - 500 piece puzzles
Breezy Singer Eastern Bluebird - realistic looking lifesize plastic, motion detector triggers song
Takara Tomy Bluebird Breezy Singers Outdoor Solar Powered (do not put outdoors as it may disturb nesting birds)
Clock - "Identiflyer" alarm desk clock with various bird sounds (on song cards) including bluebird
DEEP - (State of CT) - bluebird greeting cards in tin
Embroidery.com - patterns
Flags with bluebirds on them - various styles and sizes available
Glass bluebirds - hand-blown, Terra Studios
Willow Tree Happiness - ornament or figurine by Susan Lourdi with bluebirds on shoulder (one of my personal favorites)
Jim Rathert Photography - lovely mugs, mouse pads, coasters with original bird photography. 573.634.5446
License plates with bluebirds on them - Airstrikeinc.com
Michaelian Home - needlepoint pillow
Miles Kimball - Mad Bluebird items, calendar, swinging bluebirds
Nancy Bell of Gakona, Alaska - unique bluebird necklace. She does not have a website, but does have an email address: bell5"at"alaska.net (replace "@" with "at")
National Wildlife Federation (search for "bluebird) - Mad Bluebird apparel, ornaments, lamps, flatware, lamp, dinnerware, vase, etc.
Wild Republic Audubon Birds Eastern Bluebird Plush with Authentic Bird Sound, Stuffed Animal, Bird Toys for Kids and Birders- Singing plush bluebird toy
Wood Bird Online - lifesize, realistic basswood carving of bluebirds and other birds
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 21, 2021, 01:50:54 AM
Native American Bluebird Mythology

https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/HowtheBluebirdGotitsColor-Pima.html (https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/HowtheBluebirdGotitsColor-Pima.html)

https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/Bluebird_And_The_Coyote-Pima.html (https://www.firstpeople.us/FP-Html-Legends/Bluebird_And_The_Coyote-Pima.html)

*Native Languages of the Americas website © 1998-2020
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 21, 2021, 01:56:36 AM
Native American Bluebird Mythology, continued

Bluebird and Coyote
Children's book based on the legend of how Bluebird got her color.
https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0749694211/natilangofthe-20 (https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0749694211/natilangofthe-20)

Birds of Algonquin Legend:
    Interesting collection of legends about bluebirds and other birds in Algonquian tribes.
https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0472106112/natilangofthe-20 (https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0472106112/natilangofthe-20)

Flights of Fancy: Birds in Myth, Legend, and Superstition:
 https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0385342489/natilangofthe-20   A good book on the role of birds in world mythology, including North and South America. (https://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0385342489/natilangofthe-20   A good book on the role of birds in world mythology, including North and South America.)
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 21, 2021, 02:01:40 AM
Native American folklore
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluebird_of_happiness (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bluebird_of_happiness)

Among some Native Americans, the bluebird has mythological or literary significance.

According to the Cochiti tribe, the firstborn son of Sun was named Bluebird. In the tale "The Sun's Children", from Tales of the Cochiti Indians (1932) by Ruth Benedict, the male child of the sun is named Bluebird (Culutiwa).

The Navajo identify the mountain bluebird as a spirit in animal form, associated with the rising sun. The "Bluebird Song" is sung to remind tribe members to wake at dawn and rise to greet the sun:

Bluebird said to me,
"Get up, my grandchild.
It is dawn," it said to me.

The "Bluebird Song" is still performed in social settings, including the nine-day Ye'iibicheii winter Nightway ceremony, where it is the final song, performed just before sunrise of the ceremony's last day.

Most O'odham lore associated with the "bluebird" likely refers not to the bluebirds (Sialia) but to the blue grosbeak.[3]
Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 21, 2021, 02:15:14 AM
Bluebird of happiness*
or the popular song, see Bluebird of Happiness (song). For the Tamar Braxton album, see Bluebird of Happiness (album).
The symbol of a bluebird as the harbinger of happiness is found in many cultures and may date back thousands of years.

Origins of the bluebird as a symbol of happiness

Chinese mythology
One of the oldest examples of a blue bird in myth (found on oracle bone inscriptions of the Shang dynasty, 1766–1122 BC) is from pre-modern China, where a blue or green bird (qingniao) was the messenger bird of Xi Wangmu (the 'Queen Mother of the West'), who began life as a fearsome goddess and immortal. By the Tang dynasty (618–906 AD), she had evolved into a Daoist fairy queen and the protector/patron of "singing girls, dead women, novices, nuns, adepts and priestesses...women [who] stood outside the roles prescribed for women in the traditional Chinese family".[1] Depictions of Xi Wangmu often include a bird—the birds in the earliest depictions are difficult to identify, and by the Tang dynasty, most of the birds appear in a circle, often with three legs, as a symbol of the sun.[2]

Popular use of the idiom
The immense popularity of Maeterlinck's play probably originated the idiom in English. In 1934, this was strengthened by the popular American song "Bluebird of Happiness". Written by Sandor Harmati and Edward Heyman, it was recorded several times by American tenor Jan Peerce, for RCA Victor and also by Art Mooney and His Orchestra.

The bluebird is featured in the song "Be Like The Bluebird" in the popular musical Anything Goes.

The lyrics "Somewhere, over the rainbow, bluebirds fly" in Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg's 1938 song for the 1939 film The Wizard of Oz is a likely allusion to the idiom as well.

Shirley Temple starred in the 1940 American fantasy The Blue Bird.

In 1942, the popular song "(There'll Be Bluebirds Over) The White Cliffs of Dover" used them, despite an absence of real blue birds on those cliffs, among other imagery to lift spirits.

The Academy Award-winning song, "Zip-a-Dee-Doo-Dah," from Walt Disney's 1946 live-action and animated film Song of the South, makes reference to "Mr. Bluebird on my shoulder" as a symbol of good cheer.

In the 1946 Japanese film No Regrets for Our Youth, directed by Akira Kurosawa, when Yukie and Noge reunite in Tokyo during the war, Yukie laments that she is not happy with her career and wants to do something truly meaningful in the struggle for freedom. Noge responds, "Who finds work like that even once in their lives? It's like finding The Blue Bird of Happiness."

The bluebird is mentioned at the end of the 1968 Beatles film Yellow Submarine, when the leader of the Blue Meanies claims that his "cousin is the bluebird of happiness". Beatles Paul McCartney wrote a song about them for his band Wings’ 1973 album Band on the Run, "Bluebird".

The Velvet Underground song “Candy Says” contains a line pertaining to watching the blue birds fly as a metaphor for happiness passing by Candy Darling, the song’s subject, while she is in the wrong body. [7]

The Allman Brothers Band's 1972 song "Blue Sky" has the lyric "Don't fly, mister blue bird, I'm just walking down the road".

A scene in the 1977 Disney film The Rescuers uses the bluebird as a symbol of "faith ... you see from afar."

In the 1985 film Sesame Street Presents: Follow that Bird, the Sleaze Brothers kidnap Big Bird and press him into service in their fun fair, where he is painted blue and billed as the Blue Bird of Happiness. In a play on the word "blue," Big Bird sings the mournful song "I'm So Blue."

The lyrics of the They Might Be Giants 1989 song "Birdhouse in Your Soul" by John Linnell includes the phrase "blue bird of friendliness."

The 2001 film K-PAX, directed by Iain Softley, written by Charles Leavitt and based on the book of the same name by Gene Brewer, contains a scene in which the lead character Prot (played by Kevin Spacey), claiming to be a visitor from outer space. He ends up in a psychiatric ward where he 'prescribes' a fellow patient with the task of finding a 'Bluebird Of Happiness'. In a later scene, the fellow patient excitedly yells out that he finally found the Bluebird, resulting in pandemonium amongst patients spanning several floors of the institution.

The bluebird is also mentioned in The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya episode "The Melancholy of Haruhi Suzumiya Part III" in 2006.

Musician Neil Young has a song "Beautiful Bluebird" about a lost love on his 2007 album Chrome Dreams II.

"Blue Bird" is a song by Hope Sandoval & the Warm Inventions from their 2009 album Through the Devil Softly.

A blue bird like device can be found in "The Bluebird of Zappiness" a 2010 episode of Cyberchase. The main antagonist of the episode, which is Ledge now that Hacker has teamed up with the main protagonists to form an temporary alliance, dream is to discover the bluebird before Hacker does. They all want to find it, so they wake up at dawn, coincidentally because the episode is all about finding the length of your shadows. Inez, a girl, tries to beat Ledge, a boy, to the device, but ultimately there's a tie and it gets lost once again.

The character Luna from the 2012 video game and visual novel Zero Escape: Virtue's Last Reward wears a necklace with a caged bluebird, and the story is discussed in one ending.

The titular bluebird of the song "Birds", from the 2013 album Government Plates by the experimental hip hop group Death Grips, is thought to be referencing Charles Bukowski's poem "Bluebird", wherein the bluebird represents the vulnerability that Bukowski felt as a result of child abuse from his father.[8]

The bluebird is also mentioned by David Bowie in the song "Lazarus" from his 2016 album Blackstar.

In the 2018 video game Red Dead Redemption 2, during the scene where John Marston builds the ranch at Beecher's Hope, a bluebird is seen perched next to the gang while they are hammering and nailing the wood.

In a cartoon from Gary Larson, the (absent) bluebird of happiness is mentioned as counterpart of the "chicken of depression".

Bluebirds in nature
Three species of blue-headed North American thrushes (Turdidae) occupy the genus Sialia. The most widespread and best-known is the eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis), breeding from Canada's prairie provinces to Texas and from the Maritimes to Florida; discrete populations of this species are also found from southeastern Arizona through west Mexico into Guatemala and Nicaragua. The mountain bluebird (S. currucoides) breeds on high-elevation plains from central Alaska to Arizona and New Mexico, and the western bluebird (S. mexicana) inhabits dry coniferous forests from extreme southwestern Canada to Baja California and from the Great Basin south into west Mexico. Other all-blue birds in North and Central America are the blue mockingbird, blue bunting, indigo bunting, blue grosbeak and a number of jays, including the blue jay.

Europe has only a few birds with conspicuous blue in the plumage, including the great tit (Parus major), the various blue tits of the genus (Cyanistes) and the common kingfisher. The adult male of the blue rock-thrush is the only European passerine with all-blue plumage; this species is best known from its literary treatment by Giacomo Leopardi, whose poem Il passero solitario makes of the rock-thrush a figure of the poet's isolation.[9]

In South and Southeast Asia, the fairy-bluebirds, blue whistling thrush and verditer flycatcher are strikingly blue.


]*Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/80/Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg/150px-Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg.png)




Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 21, 2021, 10:23:03 AM
Bluebird of happiness*,  Wikipedia article, continued
Poems mentioning bluebirds

The world rolls round,—mistrust it not,—
Befalls again what once befell;
All things return, both sphere and mote,
And I shall hear my bluebird's note,
And dream the dream of Auburn dell.

— Ralph Waldo Emerson, May-Day, 1867


And when that day dawns, or sunset reddens how joyous we
shall all be! Facts will be regarded as discreditable, Truth will be
found mourning over her fetters, and Romance, with her temper
of wonder, will return to the land. The very aspect of the world
will change to our startled eyes. Out of the sea will rise
Behemoth and Leviathan, and sail round the high-pooped
galleys, as they do on the delightful maps of those ages when
books on geography were actually readable. Dragons will wander
about the waste places, and the phoenix will soar from her nest of
fire into the air. We shall lay our hands upon the basilisk, and see
the jewel in the toad’s head. Champing his gilded oats, the
Hippogriff will stand in our stalls, and over our heads will float
the Blue Bird singing of beautiful and impossible things, of
things that are lovely and that never happened, of things that are
not and that should be. But before this comes to pass we must
cultivate the lost art of Lying.

— Oscar Wilde, The Decay of Lying, 1891

References
 Cahill, Suzanne. "Performers and Female Taoist Adepts: Hsi Wang Mu as the Patron Deity of Women in Medieval China" in Journal of the American Oriental Society, Vol. 106, No. 1, Sinological Studies, p. 155-168.
 Welch, Patricia Bjaaland. Chinese Art: A Guide to Motifs and Visual Imagery. Tokyo: Tuttle Publishing, 2008, p. 204.
 Rea, 2008: Wings in the Desert.
 Mawdsley, E. (2005). The Russian Civil War. p. 21.
 Duggan, Anne E.; Haase, Donald; Callow, Helen J., eds. (2016). Folktales and Fairy Tales: Traditions and Texts from around the World. ABC-CLIO. ISBN 1610692543.
 Henry Rose, Maeterlinck's Symbolism. The Blue Bird and other essays., Dodd Mead & Co., 1911
 https://genius.com/The-velvet-underground-candy-says-lyrics
 "Bluebird - Charles Bukowski". Genius.
 Snow, David W.; Perrins, Christopher M.; Doherty, Paul; Cramp, Stanley (1998). The complete birds of the western Palaearctic on CD-ROM. Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-268579-1.



]*Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia  (https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/80/Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg/150px-Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg.png)



Title: Re: Bluebirds of Cane Ridge, Tennessee
Post by: Phyl on September 21, 2021, 05:56:03 PM
(https://cdn.acidcow.com/pics/20150824/wild_birds_cuddle_11.jpg)
Just can't get any cuter, than this.  ;)