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Chat Moderators => Decorah Eagle Mods Want You To Know -- Entertainment Page => Topic started by: glogdog on March 03, 2015, 10:02:04 PM

Title: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 03, 2015, 10:02:04 PM
Welcome to Bald Eagle Trivia.  I wanted to start a thread that was both Fun and Educational.  This thread can be a hodge podge of fun facts, tidbits, or personal experiences, videos, photos, whatever anyone wants to say about bald eagles.  It doesn't have to be just about Decorah either.  Some of you are fortunate to have Bald Eagles living near you.  If anything, if you don't know where to put your info in the forum, please feel free to post here.  Google can also be your friend, so let's have some fun!

I'll start off with a piece of trivia:

Why are they called Bald Eagles?
Bald Eagles are not bald at all, but have a white head.  Hundred of years ago the English word for WHITE was BALDE and the word "piebalde" meant mottled with white, so the eagles with white heads were called Balde Eagles.  :)

From my personal experience in Decorah last year, here's a tidbit:  If it's your first visit to Decorah, Mom and Dad LOVE perching on the first maple tree on the right as you pull onto the Hatchery driveway. Early morning around dawn is a good time to catch them there.  Here's a photo I took last July.  Mom is on the left, Dad on the right:     
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 04, 2015, 09:52:35 PM
Wow, gg.  Thanks so much for that video. Love the soaring, aerial displays, and stealing of the food in mid-air!  The song's lyrics are great too!
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 10, 2015, 05:36:15 AM
Here's a neat piece of info I came across the other day:

An eagle can consume one pound of fish in about 4 minutes. (Bald Eagles, Their Life and Behavior in North America. Wolfe and Bruning, 1997).  I'm going to time Mom or Dad the next time and check this out. :D
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: frehaws on March 10, 2015, 11:48:16 AM
Gardengirl-thank you so much for the video. It is one I will keep. I really do love this thread. Thank you Glogdog. I know you have lots of info and fun facts to share here.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 17, 2015, 05:56:46 AM
Q. Do young eagles play?

A. Yes.  Scientists believe that picking up and moving sticks and other objects (and passing them back and forth) are a form of play. Eagles of all ages have been seen passing sticks while flying and 'playing' with objects. It is thought that they learn skills in this way.

I think one of the best examples of playing is Elf's video titled, "Teeter Totter".  It does look like fun! :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=okMF8GQJ9ow
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 24, 2015, 01:02:46 PM
Have you ever noticed a bald eagle scratch itself?  If you look closely next time, I think you'll see that it almost always seems to scratch with the middle talon (that would be digit #3 on the foot).  The back or hind digit is #1, the inner digit is #2, the middle digit is #3 and the outer digit is #4.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 02, 2015, 10:41:52 PM
Can eagles swim?  Oh yes!!

http://www.fieldandstream.com/blogs/field-notes/video-eagle-swims-to-shore-with-catch-in-its-talons?src=SOC&dom=fb
 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 11, 2015, 07:10:57 AM
So what is the difference between a Bald Eagle's Leg and a Golden Eagle's leg?  Well, the feathers on a Bald Eagle do not go all the way down the leg (tarsus) like they do on the Golden Eagle.  The reason for the difference is that the bald eagle's primary diet is fish where as the golden eagle's diet is primarily birds and small mammals.  The bald eagle's lower body often gets wet during fishing, so in order for its legs to dry faster and to reduce drag in the water, the legs, or tarsi, are bare of feathers.  Take a look:
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: T40cfr403 on April 12, 2015, 06:32:02 AM
Great idea for a new thread, glogdog.

seadogsam posted a photo in DE2015 of a first class eagle stamp (attached) that got everyone talking.

ginger52 googled the stamp and found it had been issued in 1970.

I just had to find out the significance of the 1970 issue date - it commemorated the 100th anniversary of the opening of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Bald eagles in the lower 48 weren't listed on the Endangered Species Act until 1973, so this stamp was way ahead of its time! Very cool.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 12, 2015, 04:26:38 PM
Hey T40 and welcome!  I LOVE this stamp! Thank you for posting this very interesting information.  This certainly is a great piece of trivia!
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 20, 2015, 06:04:18 AM
I hope some of you have had the opportunity to watch an eagle soar, perhaps even Mom & Dad or the juveniles.  They will fly in a circle sometimes  and what they're doing is riding the thermals, updrafts of warm air that rise from the ground to the sky.  By flying a spiraling circular path within these columns of rising air, they are able to "ride" the air currents and climb to higher altitudes while expending very little energy in the process. The sight of dozens or hundreds of birds riding a thermal has been said to resemble the water boiling in a kettle, so the terms "kettle" or "boil" are sometimes used as a nickname for a flock of birds circling in a thermal updraft.  :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 29, 2015, 06:56:59 AM
The question in chat sometimes comes up, "Are Bald Eagles sociable?"  Yes, they are!  Course that would be during non-nesting season when there are no eggs or young to defend.  They can gather in groups perched in trees called "Communal Roosts" mainly during the winter months.  These areas usually have a very good food supply available and gathering in numbers gives them better protection against predators. Communal roosting areas are also great for choosing mates.  All ages gather at these areas so the young can learn from the mature also.  Here's a neat video showing an example of a Communal Roost:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5cZwmNzbJ0c&feature=related
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 13, 2015, 08:26:59 AM
The Great Seal of the United States was officially adopted on June 20, 1782.  One side of it depicts the Bald Eagle.  Here is a link to learn more about it:

http://greatseal.com/overview.html
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 23, 2015, 12:44:00 AM
Mark Stalmaster in his book, The Bald Eagle, says that the earliest mention of territoriality was made by Aristostle about 350 B.C. and appropriately, he made it in regard to eagles: "Each pair of eagles needs a large territory and on that account allows no other eagle to settle in the neighbohood." 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 05, 2015, 06:41:57 AM
I found this neat definition in Scott Weidensaul's book, Raptors The Birds of Prey:

Eagle

noun 1. any of several species of large, day-flying birds of prey.  2. silver military insignia in the shape of eagles, worn by colonels (U.S. Army, Air Force, Marine Corps) and captains (U.S. Navy).  3. ten-dollar gold coin formerly issued by U.S. government.  4. golf score of two below par on a hole. [From L. aquila, dark-colored; ME egle.]
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 16, 2015, 12:27:01 PM
If you happen to be near Wabasha, MN next week, you must stop by the National Eagle Center where they're celebrating "Bald Eagle Days - the Road to Recovery".  This will take place from June 24-27.  There are a lot of activities and programs scheduled for young and old alike. It's a beautiful place located right along the Mississippi River.  They have "live" Eagle Education programs too daily.  Here's the link:

http://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/bald-eagle-day/
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: baziunc on June 16, 2015, 03:54:09 PM
Thanks, glo!  I won't be anywhere near there, but I'm going to share this info in other Forum threads for people who might be.  :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 17, 2015, 11:57:16 AM
Thanks so much, baz!  I did visit the National Eagle Center 3 years ago and it is really a wonderful, beautiful place.  I found the "live" eagle education program very informative and that was actually the first time I saw a Bald Eagle "live" and in person.  The back of the building is mostly all glass as it faces the Mississippi River.  To be able to share in all of that AND the "Bald Eagle Days" would be really special. They have a neat gift shop too.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: BHscent on June 27, 2015, 08:28:44 PM
That is some very interesting facts Glog. I never knew about the coin? A $10.00 coin.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 27, 2015, 08:48:18 PM
hey BH!  Yes - and here is a link to read up about their value:

http://www.coinstudy.com/liberty-ten-dollar-gold-coin-values.html
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: BHscent on June 28, 2015, 06:42:13 AM
Hey glogdog, The link was a very interesting read. Thank You!
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: BHscent on June 28, 2015, 05:29:38 PM
Basic facts about the Bald Eagle.

 http://www.defenders.org/bald-eagle/basic-facts
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 28, 2015, 06:18:43 PM
Thanks so much, BH, for the Defenders of Wildlife Link of Quick facts about the Bald Eagle.  They are a good organization trying to help wildlife any way they can.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: omasawyer on July 07, 2015, 12:27:33 PM
 ;) ;)
glog; I really feel smarter now that I have checked all the Bald Eagle facts and read all of your posts. My grandfather was a Navy three star officer and he had a bald eagle on his sleeve and on his "cap". I bet he had some gold coins too. Of course he was in WW1. Just to keep my memory in tact, I will reread all of your posts again. Thank you for putting so much great info in the forum ( and I am glad I found it) ;)
[/i]
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on July 08, 2015, 12:28:51 PM
Oma - so glad you found us too!  As Tina said, "thanks" for your grandfather's service to our country.

Tina - Welcome to you too!   

Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on July 08, 2015, 12:41:53 PM
Bald Eagles are "Raptors".  What is a Raptor?  Here are some of Scott Weidensaul's answers from Raptors, The Birds of Prey:

"Raptor" is the blanket term used by ornithologists for hawks, falcons, eagles, vultures, and owls.  Eagles are diurnal (day-active) raptors.  Raptors possess feet and beaks specially adapted for hunting.  The feet have long, curved talons, which grasp and kill prey and the beak is sharply hooked for tearing meat.  They are members of the "fish-eagle" clan.  You don't think that has anything to do with Dad building his nest across the street from a hatchery, do you?  ;) :D
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on August 01, 2015, 09:50:30 PM
Here are a few more tidbits from Scott Weidensaul's Raptors, The Birds of Prey:

What is the origin of the word, "Eagle"?  It comes from the French aigle, based on the Latin aquila "eagle".

"Aquila" is the Latin name for an eagle, although possibly from the Latin aquilus, a dark brown bird.   

The Spanish word for a Bald Eagle is "Aguila Cabeciblanca".
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: eburgbirdwtchr on August 01, 2015, 10:20:16 PM
Aigle is the French word for eagle.  It can also mean "superior person" :P
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on August 02, 2015, 11:28:34 AM
Superior, eburg, as in "Apex"?  :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: frehaws on August 07, 2015, 09:29:30 PM
from the painting, Forest Flight by Ron Parker:  (a bald eagle soaring through pine trees)

"The bald eagle is a very handsome bird with its familiar "bald" or white head, powerful yellow beak and talons and an impressive eight foot wingspan. It hunts mostly fish and small mammals, but will occasionally steal a fish caught by another bird, such as the osprey. Living near water, along lakes and large rivers and coastlines, the bald eagle is the only eagle that lives in North America.  This magnificent bird of prey, the symbol of America since 1798, is no longer on the endangered species list after having spent many years there. Its population is starting to return and it has been downlisted to threatened in  the lower 48 states. It is believed that eagles mate for life."

Though not 100% accurate it accompanies the painting.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on August 15, 2015, 07:11:49 AM
frehaws - thanks for this tidbit of info.  I googled "Forest Flight" by Ron Parker and what a beautiful painting:

https://www.lighthaven.net/forest-flight

Once again, Raptors The Birds of Prey provides interesting information. (I love this book!)  "The official English and scientific name of North American birds are set by a committee of professionals, The American Ornithologists' Union, but in the past each region had its own names.  Here are some "former names" for Bald Eagles:

White-tailed eagle, American eagle, Bird of Washington (immature named by Audubon), black eagle, gray eagle, sea eagle, Bird of Freedom, white-headed eagle."
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on August 27, 2015, 09:52:26 PM
Raptors have been chosen for as namesakes for many towns and geographic features across North America.  Here are just a few that involve the word 'Eagle':

Bald Eagle (PA - 2 sites)                                   
Bald Eagle Mountain (PA)                                   
Black Eagle (MT)                                               
Eagle (AL, CO, ID, NE, NY, PA)
Eagle Bay (NY)
Eagle Bend (MN)
Eagle Butte (SD)
Eagle Cap (OR)
Eagle City (OK)
Eagle Crags (CA)
Eagle Furnace (TN)
Eagle Grove (IA)
Eagle Harbor (MD, MI, NY)
Eagle Mountain Lake (TX)
Eagle Springs (NC)

More to come later (or please feel free to add if you have one in your hometown). :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on September 17, 2015, 12:02:31 AM
Classification of Bald Eagles:

    Kingdom Animalia (the animals)
    Phylum Chordata
    Subphylum Vertebrata (animals with backbones)
    Class Aves (Birds)
    Order Falconiformes (hawks: falcons, accipiters, buteos, kites and eagles)
    Family Accipitridae
    Genus Haliaeetus (sea eagles)
    Species leucocephalus (meaning "white head" in Greek)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: BHscent on September 21, 2015, 08:30:06 AM
Classification of Bald Eagles:

    Kingdom Animalia (the animals)
    Phylum Chordata
    Subphylum Vertebrata (animals with backbones)
    Class Aves (Birds)
    Order Falconiformes (hawks: falcons, accipiters, buteos, kites and eagles)
    Family Accipitridae
    Genus Haliaeetus (sea eagles)

Love learning more and more. Thank You!
    Species leucocephalus (meaning "white head" in Greek)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on September 30, 2015, 07:57:20 PM
You're welcome, BH!

There is not a whole lot of information on the fossil record for birds of prey.  Scott Weidensaul tells us that the first modern raptors show up as fossils from the Eocene epoch some fifty million years ago, specifically sea-eagles (kin to modern bald eagles) and booted eagles of the genus Aquila, like the golden eagle. 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on October 17, 2015, 10:28:46 PM
Here are some areas in the United States where Bald Eagles are common:

Chilkat River Bald Eagle Preserve - Alaska
Skagit River Bald Eagle Natural Area - Washington
Three Sisters, Caldwell, Cougar Roosts - California
Ferry Bluff Eagle Sanctuary - Wisconsin
Eagle Valley - Wisconsin
Prairie State Eagle Refuge - Illinois
Glacier National Park - Montana
Yellowstone National Park -  Wyoming
Everglades National Park - Florida
Bear River National Wildlife Refuge - Utah
Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge - Missouri
Reelfoot National Wildlife Refuge - Tennessee
San Luis Valley - Colorado
Chippewa National Forest - Minnesota
Chesapeake Bay - Maryland, Virginia, Delaware
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on October 28, 2015, 11:04:59 PM
Here are some of the interesting statistics from Mark Stalmaster's book, The Bald Eagle, published in 1987. The following were some major food sources of nesting Bald Eagles:

In North Central Minnesota - Bullheads (35%), suckers (29%), and northern pike (14%)
In Louisiana - Catfish and coots (42%), waterfowl (16%), muskrats, nutria (also known as the river rat.)
In Northern Idaho - Yellow perch (72%), an all-fish diet.
Klamath Lake Oregon - Grebes, ducks, chubs, and suckers were most common. 13 birds, 8 fish, and 5 mammal species.
Yellowstone National Park - Various waterfowl species, cutthroat trout, 3 fish, 9 bird, and 4 mammal species.
Southeastern Alaska, 1955 - Salmon, trout, pollack, and cod (34%), a large diversity of prey and carrion.
Southeastern Alaska, 1975 - Salmon, trout, and herring, majority of prey items.
North Central Florida - Brown bullheads and blue & white catfishes (59%, American coots (19%), a total of 10 fish, 12 bird, and 9 mammal species. 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 12, 2015, 04:51:05 AM
Of all of the recognized constellations, only one is considered to have the shape of a raptor - Aquila, the Eagle, an easily seen pitchfork-shaped arrangement near Hercules in the Northern Hemisphere.  Aquila includes the bright star, Altair, the upper point in the "Summer Triangle" with the stars Deneb and Vega.  (Vega is in the constellation Lyra, the Harp, which was once known as Vultur, the Vulture.)

In Greek astronomy, Aquila may represent one of several mythological eagles, including the bird that carried Ganymede to heaven.  Another legend says that the stars are the king Meropes, who was changed into an Eagle by Hera to quiet his grieving.

Here's a link showing you what Aquila looks like in the night time sky as well as more information:

https://stardate.org/nightsky/constellations/aquila 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 22, 2015, 10:07:56 PM
Here are some interesting Falconry Terms that are also used for Bald Eagles:

Brancher - Prefledgling raptor that has scrambled out of the nest into the surrounding branches.
Casting - Pellet of indigestible fur, feathers, and bones regurgitated by raptors several hours after a meal.
Eyrie (Aerie) - Raptor nest (especially a cliff ledge).
Feak - Hawk's act of wiping its beak after feeding.
Hood - Leather device that covers the hawk's head (except the beak), blindfolding it and keeping it calm.
Jesses - Leather straps affixed to the hawk's tarsus, and clipped to the leash.
Mews - Enclosed area where hunting raptors are kept.
Rouse - Action in which a raptor raises, shakes, and lowers its body feathers.
Warble - Stretching wings
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on December 03, 2015, 10:43:00 PM
In Pro Football, we have the Philadelphia Eagles.

In College Football, here are some of the teams known as the 'Eagles':

AIB College of Business - Des Moines, IA
Alabama Southern - Monroeville, AL
Arizona Christian University - Phoenix, AZ
Boston College - Chestnut Hill, MA
Carson Newman College - Jefferson City, TN
Eastern Michigan - Ypsilanti, MI
Emory - Atlanta, GA
Faith Baptist - Ankeny, IA
Florida Gulf Coast University - Fort Myers, FL
Houston Community College - Houston, TX
Moorehead State - Moorehead, KY
North Texas - Denton, TX
Oklahoma Christian  - Oklahoma City, OK
Polk State College - Winter Haven, FL
University of Northwestern - St Paul, MN
West Coast Baptist College - Lancaster, CA
Winthrop - Rock Hill, SC
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on December 15, 2015, 07:47:10 PM
Eagles appear frequently in the Bible.  Here are a few excerpts:

Deuteronomy 32.11  As an eagle incites its nestlings forth by hovering over its brood, So he spread his wings to receive them and bore them up on his pinions.

2 Samuel 1.23  Saul and Jonathan, beloved and cherished, separated neither in life nor in death, swifter than eagles, stronger than lions.

Psalm 103.5  He fills your lifetime with good; your youth is renewed like the eagle's.

Proverbs 23.5  While your glance fits to it, it is gone! for assuredly it grows wings, like the eagle that flies toward heaven.

Isaiah 40.31  They that hope in the Lord will renew their strength, they will soar as with eagles' wings; They will run and not grow weary, walk and not grow faint.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on December 27, 2015, 04:32:04 AM
Oddly enough, although our national symbol is the Bald Eagle, a raptor, none of the states has chosen one as its official state bird.  Most picked songbirds.  There are a few game species like grouse or pheasants, and several others, waterbirds like loons, pelicans, or gulls.  Even  Mississippi, known long as the Eagle State because of the Bald Eagle on its coat of arms, chose a mockingbird.  Here is the list of State Birds.  Check it out:

http://www.50states.com/bird/#.Vn-8cRUrLIU 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 07, 2016, 11:39:05 PM
Here's a neat link giving some information about "Eagle-watching Festivals" along the Mississippi, Wisconsin, and Illinois rivers:   

http://midwestweekends.com/plan_a_trip/nature/birds_wildlife/eagle_watching_mississippi_river.html
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 19, 2016, 05:45:39 AM
  "It is said the eagle was used as a national emblem because, at one of the first battles of the Revolution (which occurred early in the morning) the noise of the struggle awoke the sleeping eagles on the heights and they flew from their nests and circled about over the heads of the fighting men, all the while giving vent to their raucous cries. "They are shrieking for Freedom," said the patriots.
   Thus the eagle, full of the boundless spirit of freedom, living above the valleys, strong and powerful in his might, has become the national emblem of a country that offers freedom in word and thought and an opportunity for a full and free expansion into the boundless space of the future."

--Maude M. Grant
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: tulsaducati on January 19, 2016, 08:00:51 AM
Here's a link to some great eagle-watching places & events in Oklahoma:  http://www.travelok.com/article_page/top-10-places-for-eagle-watching-in-oklahoma (http://www.travelok.com/article_page/top-10-places-for-eagle-watching-in-oklahoma)
To find eagle-watching opportunities in other states, just Google "eagle watching in (insert your state name)" & you'll find lots of events, tours, maps etc. to hold you over until Decorah activity picks up!  ;)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 19, 2016, 07:12:38 PM
tulsa - thanks so much for the Oklahoma information.  Our forum has at least 2 threads on nests in OK - Sooner Lake and Sequoyah National.  Great suggestion on looking up other states too!
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 28, 2016, 11:10:53 PM
So how does a Bald Eagle compare in weight to some of the other raptors?  I've chosen a few of the more familiar ones.  We'll compare Males and Females too and this is an average weight:

Bald Eagle:  Male - 9lbs  Female - 11.5lbs
 
Turkey Vultures:  Male - 4.5 to 5.4lbs   Female - 4lbs 6oz to 5lbs 2oz
Osprey:  Male - 3lbs 2oz   Female - 3lbs 7oz
Cooper's Hawk:  Male - 12oz   Female - 1lb 2oz
Red-Tailed Hawk:  Male - 2lbs 4oz   Female - 2lbs 11oz
Golden Eagle:  Male - 8lbs 10oz   Female - 10lbs 5oz
Peregrine Falcon:  Male - 1lb 4oz   Female - 1lb 12oz
American Kestrel:  Male - 4oz   Female - 5oz
California Condor: (not classified by sex) - 18lbs to 31lbs  (wow!)   
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on February 12, 2016, 05:50:18 AM
We've looked at the differences in weight of Bald Eagles vs other raptors.  Let's take a look at the differences in Speed of Flight:

Bald Eagle:                        36-44 (migrating)

Golden Eagle:                     28-32 (migrating)
                                         120 (diving to escape a peregrine falcon)
Northern Harrier:                14-38, average 24 (migrating)
Sharp-Shinned Hawk:          28 (level flight)
                                         16-60, average 30 (migrating)
Cooper's Hawk:                   21-55, average 29 (migrating)
Red-tailed hawk:                 20-40, average 29 (migrating)
                                         120 (dive-estimate)                                         
American Kestrel:                16-36, average 24 (migrating)
Peregrine Falcon:                 28-32 (flapping/gliding flight)
                                          62 (level flapping flight)
                                          175-200 (dive)
                                          273 (dive-estimate based on analysis of motion picture)

(Sources: Broun and Goodwin 1943; also Terres 1980, Kerlinger 1989, Tennesen 1992)
These stats and weight stats above found in Raptors, The Birds of Prey by Scott Weidensaul
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: frehaws on February 25, 2016, 07:02:23 PM
from "The Bald Eagle's View of American History", by C.H. Coleman, illustrated by Joanne Friar, 2006 some interesting facts.
1.  When the Europeans settled in America there were as many bald eagles living in America as there are people today living in the city of Boston.

2. As Meriweather Lewis and William Clark went  searching for a route west they reached Black Eagle Falls. Today it is known as Montana. The party was looking for food when a bald eagle dropped a salmon too heavy for it to carry to its nest. That salmon fed them all that day.

3. During the Civil War, a Wisconsin regiment adopted  a bald eagle. The soldiers called the bird, "Old Abe". Old Abe would scream warnings when the enemy attacked, he dodged bullets or flew above them for 36 battles. After the war ended Old Abe lived another 16 years. Other bald eagles were not so lucky. Engineers  built a dam across Black Eagle Falls. By 1900 the number of eagles living in America equaled half the population of today's city of Boston.

4. Bald eagles flew above the shor in North Carolina when Wilbur and Orville Wright brought their glider there in 1900. The brothers discussed how the eagles could soar and stay over one area without flapping its wings. The Wrights believed the  eagles achieved a perfect balance among wings that lift, breezes that push, and gravity that pulls. The brothers thought if they could build a glider that could soar and remain stationary as the eagles did, they could attach an engine to it and fly.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 01, 2016, 06:32:23 AM
frehaws - thank you so much for your trivia.  So interesting, especially the Wright brothers info.  First time I've read that. 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 03, 2016, 05:04:45 AM
I found some very interesting information on one of Amy's RRP Blogs dated April 27, 2012.  " So how old are Bald Eagles as a species?  Birds began to appear in the fossil record between 144 and 66 million years ago.  These ancestral birds gradually diverged into separate species.  Kites, then ancestors of today's Accipitridae, emerged tens of millions of years ago.  Like modern eagles (but not all Accipitridae) they are believed to have scavenged and hunted fish.  The first eagles descended from kites roughly 36 million years ago, and the earliest known fossil remains that closely resemble the bald eagle date back to about a million years ago."  Thank You Amy, for this interesting information.

According to Mark Stalmaster, fossil eagle bones are well represented in ancient tar deposits in California and remains from Indian middens are abundant. He also goes on to say that bald eagles probably evolved from the scavenging Asian and Australasian kites of the genus Haliastur. Today the Indian Brahminy kite is perhaps the closest living link of the sea eagles (bald eagles) to their past ancestors. (Remember, the bald eagles' scientific name is Haliaeetus leucocephalus which means 'sea eagle with white head'.)

I did a google search curious to see what an Indian Brahminy Kite looks like and found a nice pic.  It does look like a Bald Eagle! 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 16, 2016, 10:43:31 PM
This post is going to be a little bit different.  I don't know why but this popped into my mind and that is an "Eagle Scout".  The words 'eagle' and 'scout' put together.  It's a very distinguished award, one to be very proud of when obtained. So I did a little google search and what better website to go to than the National Eagle Scout Association.  Just to share a few tidbits: 

The very first Eagle Scout was Arthur Rose Eldred, a member of Troop 1 in Oceanside, New York.  He was notified August 12, 1912 and became the Boy Scouts of America's first Eagle Scout.  The number of Eagle Scouts rose to over 30,000 by the end of the decade.  In 1982, Alexander Holsinger of Normal, Illinois, became the one-millionth Eagle Scout.  Here is the Eagle Scout pledge: "I reaffirm my allegiance to the three promises of the Scout Oath.  I thoughtfully recognize and take upon myself the obligations and responsibilities of an Eagle Scout.  On my honor I will do my best to make my training and example, my rank and my influence, count strongly for better Scouting and for better citizenship in my troop, in my community, and in my contacts with other people.  To this I pledge my sacred honor."

Enjoy reading about the interesting history of the "Eagle Scout" award.  It is a very respected title as is the respect we all have for the Bald Eagle. 

http://www.nesa.org/PDF/58-435.pdf
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: RubyRed246 on March 20, 2016, 02:58:04 PM
My husband is an Eagle Scout. There is a quality about them that stays forever. Thank you for this post.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 03, 2016, 10:38:58 PM
yw, Ruby.   :)

A good deal of a raptor's day may be spent doing nothing, as this study of wintering bald eagles on the lower Connecticut River shows. Note that immature eagles because of their less polished hunting skills, must spend more time looking for food.  This information from Scott Weidensaul's book Raptors, The Birds of Prey.

Percentage of Time         Adults       Immatures

Perching                             93.2           76.5

Passive flight                        3.2             5.2

Active flight                          2.2           11.3

Feeding                                1.2             3.7

Waiting                                  .2             3.3
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 22, 2016, 10:27:09 PM
In the book The Bald Eagle, Haunts and Habits of a Wilderness Monarch, co-author Jon Gerrard talks about Eagles being around when the Europeans first arrived in North America.  Though that number may never be known with certainty, he goes on to say that they nested on both coasts and along every major river and large lake in the interior from Florida to Baja California in the South and from Labrador to Alaska in the North.  Needless to say there were many.  An interesting notation found on page 3 is as follows:

"On Manhattan Island, New York, in the mid-1800's the Bald Eagle was extremely abundant on the floating ice of the Hudson River and sometimes brought its captive fish to the trees in the park, there to eat them or as often to quarrel about them with its fellow. At about the same time along the Mississippi River, near Keokuk, Iowa, the air was "simply alive" with eagles feeding on offal discarded by the pork houses.  We suspect there were between a quarter million and a half a million Bald Eagles on the continent when Europeans first arrived."
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: baziunc on April 25, 2016, 05:43:30 PM
In the book The Bald Eagle, Haunts and Habits of a Wilderness Monarch, co-author Jon Gerrard talks about Eagles being around when the Europeans first arrived in North America.  Though that number may never be known with certainty, he goes on to say that they nested on both coasts and along every major river and large lake in the interior from Florida to Baja California in the South and from Labrador to Alaska in the North.  Needless to say there were many.  An interesting notation found on page 3 is as follows:

"On Manhattan Island, New York, in the mid-1800's the Bald Eagle was extremely abundant on the floating ice of the Hudson River and sometimes brought its captive fish to the trees in the park, there to eat them or as often to quarrel about them with its fellow. At about the same time along the Mississippi River, near Keokuk, Iowa, the air was "simply alive" with eagles feeding on offal discarded by the pork houses.  We suspect there were between a quarter million and a half a million Bald Eagles on the continent when Europeans first arrived."

glogdog, thank you.  I so much enjoyed reading your post!  What a wonderful passage about Manhattan and Keokuk - it made those scenes come to life in my mind.  It would be incredible to see such in person!
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 05, 2016, 06:10:32 AM
yw baz.

The taxonomic system used today was created by an eighteenth-century Swedish naturalist, Carolus Linnaeus (born Carl von Linee). He drew up a hierarchical system that starts with the great kingdoms of plant and animals and with each level or taxon, becomes progressively more and more specific. Linnaeus created what is known as binomial nomenclature (scientific names) that are based on Latin and Greek. Each organism is assigned a genus, or generic, name (always capitalized), which is shared with its close relatives, and a lowercase species, or specific, name.

Linnaeus, in his 1757 masterwork Systema Naturae, set down the classification and scientific names of the creatures known at that time, including the turkey vulture (Cathartes aura), bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and the American kestrel (Falco sparverius).  The genus name Haliaeetus comes from the Greek word haliaetos, meaning sea-eagle, while the specific name leucocephalus is a combination of the Greek leukos (white) and kephale (head).  "White-headed sea-eagle" is a rather good description of a bald eagle.  :) 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 19, 2016, 05:03:50 AM
One of my favorite books as you can tell is The Bald Eagle, Haunts and Habits of a Wilderness Monarch by Jon Gerrard and Gary Bortolotti.  I thank Elfruler for suggesting that book to me several years ago.  In the Preface of that book, coauthor Jon M. Gerrard, mentions making four trips to northern Saskatchewan that launched his career as an "eaglologist". lol  I like that.  In particular, Jon and Gary studied eagles on Besnard Lake.  Gary did his doctoral research from 1979 to 1982.  I wanted to share a few things with you from that book from Chapter 2 which is titled, "To Know An Eagle".  Each chapter starts off with a quote and this one is, "But you never were made as I, On the wings of the winds to fly! The Eagle said,"  Will Carleton.

Here's another part of this chapter that was written by Gary Bortolotti expressing his thoughts that still ring true for so many today:  "What is the bird, the Bald Eagle, that we have come so far to study?  The image of an eagle arouses as many different feelings as there are people; few birds have elicited such strongly opposing emotions as these predators.  Worldwide, eagles have been revered as symbols of majesty, grace, and power, inspiring poets and politicians alike.  Yet all species have suffered from senseless, often relentless persecution.  It was no doubt the sense of power and grandeur associated with the Bald Eagle that in 1782 inspired the people of the United States of America to adopt this bird as their national symbol.  It is certainly an impressive-looking bird.  Whether perched motionless on a dead branch above a river, its head glistening pearly white in the sun, or soaring gracefully in a light wind along a cliff, its wings spreading dark and wide in the breeze, this bird is truly awe-inspiring."  :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 13, 2016, 05:54:35 AM
If you happen to live near or would like to make a trip to the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN this week they will be celebrating the Bald Eagles Road to Recovery on June 17-18.  This celebration commemorates the anniversary of the bald eagle's removal from the endangered species list in 2007.  Here's the link to the National Eagle Center showing events as well as an article about the delisting from the USFWS.

https://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/bald-eagle-day/

http://www.fws.gov/pacific/ecoservices/BaldEagleDelisting.htm

Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: Bob1603 on June 29, 2016, 05:24:33 PM
Here is an excellent article with 14 facts about bald eagles.  Many readers may already know them but it is nice to see them publicized. 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/lifestyle/pets-animals/14-bold-facts-about-bald-eagles/ar-BBsASZV?li=BBnbcA0
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on July 02, 2016, 12:57:50 AM
Bob - thanks so much for posting your 14 interesting facts!  I do wish though that they would stop dubbing the eagle's cry for a hawk's.  I could listen to Mom & Dad's squees all day long and never get tired of them.  :D

Well this is the holiday weekend that we celebrate July 4, Independence Day, the day in 1776 that the Declaration of Independence was adopted by the Continental Congress.  On page 1 of this thread, I mention the Great Seal of the United States.  The choice of that seal fell to Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, and John Adams, all among the drafters of the Declaration of Independence.  The trio's first ideas were complex and filled with biblical or classical references - Hercules, Moses, and the Pharaoh, the Goddess of Justice - and weren't accepted by Congress.  Later committees began considering eagles, although at first they toyed with the sort of double-headed eagle found on many European coats of arms.  Finally in 1782, the Secretary of the Congress, Charles Thompson, got the task of taking the earlier proposals and creating a simple, effective seal.  His idea, after some alterations, was accepted by Congress June 20, 1782.  It showed a bald eagle with a striped shield on its chest holding the olive branch of peace in one foot and the arrows of war in the other.  In its beak was a banner with Jefferson't motto E Pluribus Unum (From Many, One), and a constellation of 13 stars over its head.  See my link on page 1 for the picture.  :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on July 30, 2016, 09:32:40 PM
What if you come across a Bald Eagle (or another raptor/bird) that is banded?  Who do you report it to?  Well, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service would love to know.  You can contact them by email at www.reportband.gov or call 1-800-327-BAND.  Here's the link for more information:

https://www.fws.gov/birds/surveys-and-data/bird-banding/reporting-banded-birds.php
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on August 12, 2016, 09:51:49 PM
Back last August, I mentioned some towns named after Raptors.  Here's a few more:

Eagle Summit (AK)
Eagle Mere (PA)
Eagletail Mountain (AZ)
Eagletown (NC, OK)
Eagle Valley (NY)
Eagle Village (AK, IN)
Eagleville (CA, CT, MO, NY-2 sites, PA, TN)
Grey Eagle (MN)
Imperial Eagle Channel (B.C.)
Little Eagle (SD)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on August 27, 2016, 05:44:34 AM
In chat, you may remember us talking about the difference in size between northern bald eagles and southern ones.  That's called Bergmann's Rule.  Northern Bald Eagles are much larger than Southern ones.  Larger sizes are found in colder climates, smaller sizes in warmer climates.  Gary Bortolotti states that the smallest Bald Eagles breed in Florida, and the largest in Alaska (probably in the Aleutian Islands).  In between is a gradation of small to large from south to north.  The boundary between them was arbitrarily set at 40 degrees north latitude.  So where is that?  I found a neat link with a map of the U.S. and some photos of cities that it runs through.  Check it out:

http://petapixel.com/2012/10/29/photographer-capturing-the-40th-parallel-all-across-the-united-states/
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on October 10, 2016, 09:28:25 PM
Can an eagle eat and fly at the same time? Well, I'll let you decide.  Here is probably my most favorite video of Bald Eagles (outside of our Decorah eagles of course).  ;) This video has the most fitting music as you watch the beauty of eagles soaring - those large, powerful, graceful wings.  There's so much to see in this video.  Convocations (groups of eagles on the ground or on ice), young immatures and matures together.   The young ones I bet are learning a lot.  You see the agile, superb flying skills and abilities of eagles as they catch their prey.  Maneuvers that you marvel at.  Oh yes, and can they really eat and fly at the same time?! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3g3LN9AxxzA     
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 02, 2016, 10:36:14 PM
One of the more common questions asked about Bald Eagles is "How long do they live?"  The average is 25-30 years in the wild and up to 50 years in captivity.  Well, one bald eagle found last June 2015 in upstate New York lived for 38 years, a new national record.  Here's the article:

http://blogs.mprnews.org/newscut/2015/06/nations-oldest-bald-eagle-a-minnesotan-dead-at-38/
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 19, 2016, 12:14:05 AM
So how fast do those big, beautiful wings of a Bald Eagle work while in flight? Well researchers Jon Gerrard and Gary Bortolotti spent time observing Bald Eagles up at Besnard Lake in Saskatchewan and here is what they recorded.  First of all, the feathers of the wing and tail of a fledgling are longer than those of adults.  As an eagle matures, its wings become shorter and narrower and its tail shorter with each successive molt. The larger wing of an immature or a sub-adult permits them to fly slower so here's the stats when they counted wing flaps during flight:  Adult eagles flapping steadily in calm air fly at 28-32 miles per hour. Immatures with their relatively larger wings flap slower than adults. That changes progressively as an eagle ages.  The flapping rates of 13 immatures averaged 167 flaps per minute; of 2 near-adults 177 flaps per minute; and of 28 adults 188 flaps per minute. Information taken from their book, The Bald Eagle - Haunts and Habits of a Wilderness Monarch.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on December 19, 2016, 10:54:26 PM
Bald Eagles regurgitate pellets after eating, usually the morning after a meal. Pellets are formed in the gizzard, passed from there to the mouth, and then are vomited or "cast".   They are made up of the undigestible parts of food like feathers, fur, and some bones.  Pellets can be many shapes and sizes.  Typical shapes are cylindrical and spherical. In one study in Illinois, 29 were examined.  20 were cylindrical and averaged 7.1 centimeters in length (2.79 inches) and 2.5 centimeters in diameter (.98 inch).  The other 9 were spherical and about 2.1 centimeters in diameter (.826 inch).
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on December 27, 2016, 11:59:26 PM
If you live in Iowa, there are plenty of Eagle watching events planned for January, February, and March.  Here's the listing from the Iowa DNR:

http://www.iowadnr.gov/About-DNR/DNR-News-Releases/ArticleID/1107/2017-bald-eagle-watching-events
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 19, 2017, 09:39:00 PM
Did you know that January is National Bald Eagle Watch month? Well it is!  The National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN has some upcoming Eagle Viewing Trips. 

Hey - who do I see listed under "Eagle Nest Cam Links" off on the right-hand side of the page? ;D  Now there's a good place to park yourself and watch. ;)

 https://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/eagle-viewing/   
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on February 22, 2017, 04:55:44 AM
So sometimes we get asked the question in  Chat, "How long does it take to build a Bald Eagle's nest?"  Most references will tell us that it could take less than a week in a pinch...generally it takes a few months.  Well now, we have definitive proof of the "less than a week" part.  There is a Bald Eagle's nest up in Pittsburgh, PA - the Pittsburgh Hays Nest, that has quite a story that has unfolded this month.  Details from their website are that "The eagles laid their 1st egg on 2/10/17 @ 5:49 PM.  Two days later their nest tree blew down in a wind storm on 2/12/17 @ 9:30 PM.  On 2/15/17 the eagles started building a new nest about 100 yards from the fallen nest tree and in 4 days the new nest was complete.  On 2/19/17 a group of citizen scientists viewed incubation behavior which suggested the female laid her 3rd egg in the new nest with the assumption the 2nd egg was laid elsewhere by the female."  Now that IS amazing!  Here's the link to the cam:

http://www.pixcontroller.com/eagles/index.htm   
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 04, 2017, 07:26:52 AM
From the Minnesota DNR Daily Digest Bulletin, here's a link to many outdoor events and activities related to birds, raptors including Bald Eagles, and more if you live in the Midwest.  Of special note...off to the left-hand side of the page is another link in blue, "Where Eagles Land".  It lists Eagle watching festivals for 2017. Even though most have passed, there are events going on this weekend in Ferryville, WI and Wabasha, MN to enjoy.  Take note to check for this next year when January rolls around.  Time to get outside and enjoy nature for all it's worth.  :)

https://midwestweekends.com/plan_a_trip/nature/birds_wildlife/spring_birding_festivals.html?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_name=&utm_source=govdelivery&utm_term=   
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 05, 2017, 06:23:44 AM
Why do avian biologists and researchers band birds including Bald Eagles?  Does the bird know that band is there?  What information is on it?  I first dove into Dr. Scott Nielsen's book, A Season with Eagles, for answers and then tapped into two of Amy's Blogs.  Dr. Nielsen's book, page 63, has a great photo of a 3 week old eaglet, the perfect age for banding.  Dr. Nielsen states that this age keeps the chances of nest desertion to a minimum.  Researchers wait until the eaglets are 2-3 weeks of age after bonding has occurred.  One of Amy Ries's Blogs mentions the 20-30 day age range when RRP bands peregrine falcons as a window.

So what is gained or learned from banding?  One of Amy's blogs states it is to study "movement, survival, and behavior."  Things like dispersal patterns, migration routes, behavior, social structure, seasonal and long-term population trends, and mortality rates are just some of the reasons. 
 
Bands are very light and only put on when the leg is fully or pretty much reached its adult size.  These government issued bands each have a unique number issued by the North American Bird Banding Lab. The banders record the location of the nest (site name and coordinates), the sex (if known), the band number, the actual or approximate age of the bird, and the bird bander.

If you find a bird with a band, Amy advises the following:  "You can report bands to the Bird Banding Lab by calling 1-800-327-2263 or going to their website at http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/BBL/bblretrv/."

Here are two RRP Blog links to find out more:

https://raptorresource.blogspot.com/2013/02/banding-birds-part-i-brief-history.html

https://raptorresource.blogspot.com/2013/03/03012013-banding-birds-part-ii-how-we.html
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on April 08, 2017, 06:24:32 AM
Just came across some interesting information that goes right along with my post above about banding.  This from the Center for Conservation Biology - just when you think you're just grabbing your camera to photograph eagles, there's more to this than meets the eye!  Read how photographers are helping raptor biologists:

http://www.ccbbirds.org/2017/04/04/eagle-photographers-contribute-to-science/
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 20, 2017, 06:05:49 AM
Happy American Eagle Day!  On June 20, 1782, the Bald Eagle became our nation's symbol and national bird.  It was added to the official seal of the United States.  Bald eagles also hold significant value in many Native American cultures and religions, where they signify freedom, strength, honesty, wisdom, and power.  Here's one of my all-time favorite eagle videos showing the majesty and beauty of the bald eagle.  :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3g3LN9AxxzA
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on August 14, 2017, 10:09:32 PM
You know how you see something a hundred times, but not REALLY see it?  Not really notice it?  How about the symbol of the U.S. Postal service?  Yep - it's the Bald Eagle!  There's been only 3 Seals of the Postal Service - Mercury, the Roman messenger of the gods, a Post Horse in speed with mail bags and rider, and a Bald Eagle poised for flight.  President Nixon signed the Postal Reorganization Act into law on August 12, 1970 with the Bald Eagle becoming the seal.  Then on October 12, 1993, Postmaster General, Marvin Runyan, unveiled the new corporate logo - an eagle's head in flight leaning into the wind.  On September 12, 1995, it became a registered trademark.  It has not replaced the official seal from 1970.   Here's two interesting links to read and see the 3 seals and the logo:

https://about.usps.com/publications/pub100/pub100_082.htm

https://uspsblog.com/the-history-behind-the-usps-logo/ 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: gardengirl on August 15, 2017, 06:48:32 AM
Very interesting information, glogdog! Thanks for researching and sharing! Eagle on!    :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on October 21, 2017, 07:15:37 AM
Some Bald Eagle Songs:

The Eagle and the Hawk, by John Denver https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R15vi55cJmk
Eagle, by ABBA https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qdoSy4ROZpg
Fly Eagle Fly, by James Rogers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAyTK5Q9tJI
Fly Like an Eagle, The Steve Miller Band https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OnlTrq6wLf0
Rocky Mountain High, by John Denver https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FWooDCkkkVQg
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 30, 2017, 10:56:09 PM
If you live in Kansas or Missouri, there are some Eagle Day Events coming up during these winter months.  These are two of the states where Bald Eagles from the North make their trek on down to warmer temps for the winter.  Here's some information on each state for places to view them. 

For Kansas: http://kswildlife.org/ww/events/

For Missouri: https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/events/eagle-days   
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on December 26, 2017, 03:23:17 PM
Some Eagle watching events coming up next month in Iowa and elsewhere:

Clinton Bald Eagle Watch Jan 6, 2018 in Clinton, IA
http://stewardsumrr.org/tours-and-events/2015-clinton-bald-eagle-watch/

Dubuque Bald Eagle Watch Jan 28, 2018 Port of Dubuque, IA
http://www.dubuquecameraclub.com/event/2018-bald-eagle-watch/

Ferry Bluff Eagle Council Bald Eagle Watching Days Jan 12-13, 2018 Sauk City & Prairie Du Sac, WI
http://ferrybluffeaglecouncil.org/

Soar with Eagle Days Events along the Fox River Jan 13, Jan 20-21, Jan 27, 2018, Northeast Wisconsin
http://eagledaysalongthefox.org/

Bald Eagle Days Jan 26-28, 2018 at the Lewis and Clark Visitor Center in Crofton, Nebraska
http://soarraptors.org/event/bald-eagle-days-2018-lewis-and-clark-visitor-center-2/

Bald Eagle Watch Jan 5-6, 12-13, 2018 at Salt Plains Wildlife Refuge Jet, OK
https://www.fws.gov/nwrs/threecolumn.aspx?id=2147563006
 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: gardengirl on January 09, 2018, 06:31:37 PM
Here is some good information from the latest Ia DNR newsletter. Lots of bald eagles converging in Iowa, Wisconsin and Minnesota now.  I found the graphs interesting. If you click on IA Survey Results you can scroll around and read reports on all sorts of wildlife, not just eagles.  Fascinating.

https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/IACIO/bulletins/1d0810b

Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 21, 2018, 05:46:54 AM
Thanks so much, gardengirl, for this interesting information and it's good to see that the the Bald Eagle population in Iowa has increased over the years.  Looking at the National Survey results, I hope the states of Texas, Arizona, Colorado and Nebraska figure out why the eagle populations have significantly decreased.

For those venturing out who are trying to watch and photograph Bald Eagles, here are 5 hotspots to do that according to Audubon:

Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, Utah
Conowingo Dam, Maryland
LeClaire, Iowa (Lock and Dam 14 on the Mississippi River)
Loess Bluffs National Wildlife Refuge, Missouri
Skagit River, Washington
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: e3forpresident on January 25, 2018, 09:42:57 AM
Thank you Glo for all you wonderful information
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 04, 2018, 12:31:52 PM
Thank you, e3.  :)

I'm going to deviate slightly here in that I came across something interesting on FaceBook the other day that I had not heard of before and that's an "Eagle Owl".  I then googled it and found some information on 'The Peregrine Fund' website.  There's one called the Eurasian Eagle-Owl, among the world's largest owls.  They're found in Europe, Asia, and parts of northern Africa.  At first sight of a photo, it reminds me of a Great Horned Owl because of those upright tufts of feathers on its head resembling ears.  Here's the link for more info:

https://www.peregrinefund.org/explore-raptors-species/Eurasian_Eagle-owl
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 05, 2018, 11:09:36 PM
So are any streets across America named after bald eagles?  Well if you're lucky enough you live on one of the following:

W. Bald Eagle Boulevard in White Bear Lake, MN
Bald Eagle Rd in Clover, SC
Bald Eagle Rd in Weymouth, MA
Bald Eagle Rd NW in Albuquerque,NM
Bald Eagle Rd Lake Wylie, SC
Bald Eagle Rd in Rehoboth Beach, DE
Bald Eagle Rd in Ariel, WA
Bald Eagle Street in Murrieta, CA
Bald Eagle Street in Johnstown, PA
Bald Eagle Street in Lock Haven, PA
Bald Eagle Street in Blanchard, PA
Bald Eagle Lane in Wilmington, NC
Bald Eagle Lane in Kenly,NC
Bald Eagle Lane SW in Tumwater, WA
Bald Eagle Court in Santa Rosa Beach, FL
Bald Eagle Court in Randallstown, MD
Bald Eagle Court Royal Palm Beach, FL
Bald Eagle Way in Douglasville, GA
Bald Eagle Way in Grand Prairie, TX
Bald Eagle Way in Belcamp, MD
Bald Eagle Way in Huntertown, IN
Bald Eagle Way in Mcdonough, GA
Bald Eagle Way San Antonio, TX
Bald Eagle Way in Carbondale, CO
Bald Eagle Way in Naples, FL
(can you believe all these names of streets?) lol.  Ok, I'll stop here.  :)
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on June 20, 2018, 04:05:03 AM
Happy American Eagle Day!  It is celebrated annually on June 20 to commemorate the day in 1782, when the bird was added to the official Seal of the United States.  The Bald Eagle is the national symbol of freedom, courage, strength, spirit and excellence.  Today we also celebrate their comeback from the effects of DDT, habitat destruction, and environmental carelessness.  Bald eagles were listed as an endangered species in 1967 under the Endangered Species Preservation Act and later transferred to the list of threatened and endangered species under the 1973 Endangered Species Act due to their recovery.  It was finally removed from the Endangered list back in 2007 but is still protected under Federal Law. The number of bald eagles nesting pairs dropped to 417 in the lower 48 states back in the 60's but today there are over 15,000 nesting pairs.

If you happen to live near the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN, they are having some events this weekend called "Bald Eagle Days".  Here's the link with information: https://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/bald-eagle-day/

Also here is one of my favorite videos titled, "Soaring Eagles".  You can see and feel the majesty of these beautiful, amazing birds.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3g3LN9AxxzA

So Happy Bald Eagle Day, Mom Decorah and D29, D30, and D31 and you too, Dad wherever you are.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 12, 2018, 06:35:54 AM
Wow!  it's been a while since I've been here so let's get going again.  Have you all ever heard of Hawk Mountain Sanctuary up in Kempton, PA?  It's a Non-profit 2,600 acre wild bird sanctuary where hawk and other raptors can be viewed and are counted as part of a longitudinal study.  They partner with Hawk Migration Association of America, HawkWatch International, and Bird Studies Canada.  Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory in Duluth, MN is one of their participants too.  Besides hawks, many other raptor species are counted including Bald Eagles.  The Fall migration count at Hawk Mountain Sanctuary began August 15 and runs through December 15 for this location.  So far there's been 457 Bald Eagles counted.  At Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory in MN there's been 4,348 Bald Eagles counted.  Spring and Fall Migration must be something to see at these places.  Here's a link to Hawk Count where you can get lost in all of their data: https://hawkcount.org/index.php 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 01, 2019, 08:15:32 AM
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL! Let's start off the new year in a fun way.  January is filled with Eagle Watching events.  Here's a neat webpage telling of events up in the Midwest...places like Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Illinois:

https://midwestweekends.com/plan_a_trip/nature/birds_wildlife/eagle_watching_mississippi_river.html
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on February 02, 2019, 08:34:29 PM
For the month of February, here are a few more Bald Eagle Watching events/opportunities in Iowa and Wisconsin.  All information gathered from each state's Department of Natural Resources webpage (DNR):

Iowa - February 9 - Des Moines Bald Eagle Watch from 10AM to 3PM at the Fellowship Baptist Church 1503 SE 6th Street and on the SE 6th Street Bridge, Des Moines, IA.

February 9 - Milton, WI Milton Eagle Day.  Hoo's Woods Raptor Center presenting a program at the Northside Intermediate School in Milton, WI from 12:30 to 3:00 PM CST.
 
February 22-23 - Bald Eagle Appreciation Days in Prairie du Chien, WI.  Friday evening - free birding programs at Country Inn & Suites.  Saturday programs and exhibits at Hoffman Hall 9am-3pm  Hoffman Hall is located at 1600 S Wacouta Ave - Prairie Du Chien, WI 53821.  Information: 608-326-8555 x11
Toll Free: 800-732-1673
 
February 22-23 - Near Marquette, IA - Effigy Mounds National Monument, Bald Eagle Appreciation Event.  Contact Effigy Mounds National Monument: 563-873-3491 ext. 123.

February 24 - Saylorville, IA Bald Eagle Watch from 12 to 4PM.  Cottonwood Rec Area and Bob Shetler Rec Area will be open for viewing. Eagle movie at the lake visitor center.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on February 10, 2019, 12:44:47 PM
Let's jump on over to another part of the country - Oklahoma, home to several Bald Eagle's nests of which we've had threads here in the forum - Sequoyah National and Sooner Lake are 2 that come to mind.  Thanks to tulsaducati for posting this link on her FB page about the eagles in Oklahoma and some Bald Eagle viewing events coming up:

https://www.tulsaworld.com/lifestyles/home-and-garden/scout-out-the-best-spots-for-eagle-watching-in-oklahoma/article_66e44bf1-0afa-5ec4-bd22-588762463c40.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=user-share&fbclid=IwAR3mPQo1wvxq-lkaAkrwJd1L4oNEaKQ54bmHYbr14KIKVvePeosrFulqTVs 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 04, 2019, 01:18:33 PM
So I was looking through The Bald Eagle, Haunts and Habit of a Wilderness Monarch, by Jon M. Gerrard and Gary R Bortolotti and found some interesting statistics.  Jon Gerrard says it has to do with the differences in the size and shape of the wing between adult and immature Bald Eagles.  That gives rise to other differences in their flight one of which is their optimum speed. This optimum speed depends on the size and shape of the wing and weight of the bird.  His observations on Besnard Lake in Saskatchewan suggested that "adult eagles flapping steadily in calm air fly at 28-32 miles per hour.  Immatures, with their relatively larger wings, flap slower than adults. That changes progressively as an eagle ages."  Here are his findings: Flapping rates of 13 immatures averaged 167 flaps per minute; of 2 near-adults, 177 flaps per minute; and of 28 adults, 188 flaps per minute.
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on September 22, 2019, 09:33:46 PM
It's that time of year for bird and raptor migration.  A great website filled with a lot of information is the Hawk Migration Association of North America's Raptor Migration Database.  Here's the link.  http://hawkcount.org/ Click on it and then off to the left-hand side, click on 'Find a Hawkwatch' close to where you live.  If you're new to hawk watching, check out this link: https://www.hmana.org/new-to-hawkwatching/?fbclid=IwAR00j3y7_wU0uJ7bAV7TGIsEvkum2hejNGnd808SukJXjeNyirzI4Me0EuY

Migration counts can  include Hawks, Bald Eagles, Golden Eagles, Kites, Kestrels, Turkey Vultures, Peregrine and Prairie Falcons, Ospreys, Goshawks and Harriers. 
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on October 04, 2019, 07:42:24 PM
Here's a very positive, encouraging article that I found dated July 3, 2019 on The Center for Conservation Biology webpage.  The 2019 survey results for Bald Eagles nesting along the James River in Virginia show that there are 302 pairs of Bald Eagles.  It says that back in the 1970's the species completely disappeared as a breeder.  Read about their remarkable comeback.  BTW, this webpage is filled with other great information:
https://ccbbirds.org/2019/07/03/james-river-bald-eagles-reach-symbolic-milestone-of-300-pairs/
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 07, 2019, 07:46:25 PM
So here's proof that Bald Eagles do play. :) Thanks eaglewhisperer, RRP, Explore, and the camera operator at the Mississippi River Flyway cam.  https://youtu.be/E2YAKcwIubw
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on December 06, 2019, 09:10:03 PM
If you happen to live in Minnesota, here's a good read about where to find birds in the winter:

https://bit.ly/2rmm9Aj
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on February 01, 2020, 01:35:28 PM
Kudos to the state of Ohio.  Here's an interesting link from the Ohio Department of Natural Resources page explaining that for the first time in 8 years they are attempting to find every Bald Eagle nest in the state.  I thank fellow Moderator, Jfrancl, for bringing this to my attention and thought you all would enjoy reading it.
   
http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/wildlife-home/post/help-discover-all-of-ohio-s-bald-eagle-nests
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 08, 2020, 11:27:41 AM
Not all Bald Eagles nest in trees or on cliffs.  How about a cactus?  A recent article from the Arizona Game & Fish Department shows a photo of Bald Eagles nesting in a Saguaro Cactus. It's been decades since they've been spotted.  Here's the article:

https://www.azgfd.com/azgfd-biologists-document-first-bald-eagle-nest-in-saguaro-cactus/
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on July 04, 2020, 04:11:56 PM
Happy 4th of July everyone!  Today we celebrate Independence Day in America commemorating the Declaration of Independence of the United States which occurred on July 4, 1776.  Six years later the Bald Eagle was chosen as the emblem of the United States.  The Raptor Resource Project wrote a great write-up today on how the Bald Eagle became our national symbol.  Thanks, RRP.  Here's the link:

https://www.raptorresource.org/2020/07/04/happy-4th-of-july/

Also I'd like to add this video which shows the power and majesty of Bald Eagles:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3g3LN9AxxzA

Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on September 03, 2020, 08:23:02 PM
I came across this wonderful news story from Audubon which occurred in May, 2020.  For the first time in 115 years an eaglet was spotted in a Bald Eagle's nest on Cape Cod.  :)

 https://www.audubon.org/news/this-bald-eagle-chick-first-hatched-cape-cod-115-years
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on November 15, 2020, 10:14:54 AM
It's that time of year to get out and see some Eagles with migration still occurring.  Here's the link to the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN.  If you're lucky enough to live close by, here's some viewing informaion: https://tinyurl.com/yy76hsuv

One more link that explains why Winter is the best time to view eagles at the National Eagle Center: https://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/winter-eagles/

Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on January 22, 2021, 07:46:15 PM
The National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN, provides a lot of great information especially during the winter months.  There are several chances to view bald eagles as they congregate closer to Lock & Dams where the water doesn't freeze up, providing a good food source.  Here's a link from their webiste that gives Bald Eagle number counts at various locations: https://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/winter-bald-eagle-count/   
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on March 28, 2021, 07:22:46 PM
Here's a recent article from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service about the growing numbers of Bald Eagles:

https://www.fws.gov/news/ShowNews.cfm?ref=america%E2%80%99s-bald-eagle-population-continues-to-soar&_ID=36871&fbclid=IwAR0OF86tAudarJghsHsmossCgJJEbqohWLVqA0e208iMZRmovpD4LOBlcm4
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on May 01, 2021, 07:37:07 AM
A rare occurrence in Wisconsin this Bald Eagle season - 4 eaglets seen in a nest at 1000 Islands.  Textbooks say that less than 1% of bald eagle nests have 4 eggs, let alone all hatch.  Here's the link:

https://1000islandsenvironmentalcenter.org/1000-islands-location-of-bald-eagle-nest-with-a-rare-hatching-of-four-eaglets/
Title: Re: Bald Eagle Trivia
Post by: glogdog on September 17, 2021, 07:39:13 PM
If you are fortunate to live near the National Eagle Center in Wabasha, MN, you have the chance to go on a Bald Eagle Field Trip from October 2021 thru April 2022.  The beautiful National Eagle Center building sits right on the banks of the Mississippi River.  During the winter months hundreds of Bald Eagles migrate to the Mississippi River for open water to find food.  The field trips are led by expert naturalists.  Here's the link.  Check out the other field trips too of other species:

https://www.nationaleaglecenter.org/eagle-viewing/#Bald-Eagles